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Tuesday, 27 March 2012 15:53

Bull moves Cobol and C apps to Java

Written by Nick Farrell



Develops LiberTP transaction processing engine


Bull has developed a  transaction processing application platform, dubbed Libert TP, which it says will allow businesses to move legacy applications from Cobol or C to Java.

Laurent de Jerphanion, marketing manager for Libert TP said there were a lot of its customers who have huge repositories of business methods written in Cobol or C. They should be running on a modern platform like Java EE. Bull has been working on the new platform for about two years and already has a number of its customers interested in it.  Apparently it is popular among those who run Tuxedo, the application server for non-Java languages that Oracle inherited with its acquisition of BEA.

LiberTP makes it cheaper to support Java than to support Tuxedo or other types of platform, he claimed. It offers hem a way out into the Java world without having to rewrite their Cobol applications.

More here.

Nick Farrell

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