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Monday, 26 March 2012 11:25

Facebook moans about snooping employers

Written by Nick Farrell



Hey, boss, leave your staff alone


Social notworking site, Facebook has blasted employers who spend all their time spying on their employee's pages looking for dirt.

Facebook chief privacy officer Erin Egan has told Facebook members not to share passwords with current or potential employers. Writing in his bog, Egan said that she had seen a distressing increase in reports of employers or others seeking to gain inappropriate access to people's Facebook profiles or private information.

He was alarmed that some where even asking employees to reveal their passwords.  She said that the snooping employers undermine the privacy of workers, and their friends at Facebook, while exposing themselves to legal risks. She said you should not be forced to share your private information and communications just to get a job.  If you are the friend of a Facebook user, you shouldn't have to worry that your private information or communications will be revealed to someone you don't know and didn't intend to share with just because that user is looking for a job.

Egan explained that Facebook made it a violation of its policy to share or solicit an account password. She has a point, but any employer who asks you for that sort of information in your job interview is probably the sort of outfit that you do not want to work for anyway.

Nick Farrell

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