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Thursday, 22 March 2012 05:32

Intel's 32nm Atom 'Valley View' has Ivy Bridge graphics core

Written by Jon Worrel

intel atom logo

Dual-core Atom chip with DirectX 11 support

According to a recent discovery by the folks over at Phoronix, Intel is currently developing a 32nm Atom SoC with very promising integration of an Ivy Bridge-based graphics core capable of supporting DirectX 11 and two DisplayPort panels, among a number of other features.

Intel's 32nm Atom SoC with Ivy Bridge graphics core is codenamed "Valley View" and marks a departure from the company's traditional push to integrate PowerVR-based graphics cores in its Atom processors. The discovery of this chip was made by Intel's Open Source Technology Center releasing a set of 25 driver patches for hardware vendors to begin testing their latest developments on new Linux kernel releases in the open-source world.

Nevertheless, Intel's 32nm Valley View is a dual-core Atom chip with support for two DisplayPort monitors, one HDMI panel, DirectX 11 support and OpenCL support. It also features a new interrupt architecture and has a different Turbo Boost interface distinct from Intel's acutal Ivy Bridge-based processors (probably more suited for ultra low voltage environments).

The new low-power chip family is expected to be paired with Intel's Balboa Pier chipset and will be launched as Intel's next-generation 32nm Atom platform sometime at the very end of 2012 or the first half of 2013.

Last modified on Thursday, 22 March 2012 05:48

Jon Worrel

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