Featured Articles

IHS teardown reveals Galaxy S5 BOM

IHS teardown reveals Galaxy S5 BOM

Research firm IHS got hold of Samsung’s new flagship smartphone and took it apart to the last bolt to figure out…

More...
Galaxy S5, HTC One M8 available selling well

Galaxy S5, HTC One M8 available selling well

Samsung’s Galaxy S5 has finally gone on sale and it can be yours for €699, which is quite a lot of…

More...
Intel lists Haswell refresh parts

Intel lists Haswell refresh parts

Intel has added a load of Haswell refresh parts to its official price list and there really aren’t any surprises to…

More...
Respawn confirms Titanfall DLC for May

Respawn confirms Titanfall DLC for May

During his appearance at PAX East panel and confirmed on Twitter, Titanfall developer Respawn confirmed that the first DLC pack for…

More...
KFA2 GTX 780 Ti Hall Of Fame reviewed

KFA2 GTX 780 Ti Hall Of Fame reviewed

KFA2 gained a lot of overclocking experience with the GTX 780 Hall of Fame (HOF), which we had a chance to…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Monday, 19 March 2012 12:27

28nm works well for Nvidia

Written by Fuad Abazovic

nvidia

Production is fine


It is always a cat and mouse game. Who can get the most out of the brand new 28nm production process?

AMD started making its 28nm chips late last year, started selling them early this year and it has roughly a one-quarter lead over Nvidia.

Nvidia is launching 28nm Kepler GTX 680 this week and we are hearing that Nvidia is pleased with its yields. Of course, Nvidia would like to have even more wafers, but TSMC cannot churn out enough of them, as it also has to service other 28nm customers.

Kepler is currently shipping to many OEMs and AIBs (Add in board partners) and traditionally AIBs were never happy with the volume of new graphics cards that they are getting. 

Since Kepler performs quite well, Nvidia and its partners expect strong sales and they believe they can quickly sell all the cards that they manage can get in.

However, it seems TSMC’s transition issues are getting serious. Shifting from a manufacturing process to a new, smaller one, e.g. 40nm to 28nm is becoming increasingly problematic, we witnessed this trend in previous transitions and it now seems to be getting worse. You can expect that going to 20nm is not going to be walk in a park either.

 

blog comments powered by Disqus

To be able to post comments please log-in with Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments