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Monday, 12 March 2012 11:21

Sabu was a petty criminal

Written by Nick Farrell



FBI spills its own files


The FBI has released its files on the Anonymous hacker Sabu and it turns out that far from being a fine upstanding member of the community who was a committed social reformer, he was a petty criminal who tried to flog dope. [Well at least he had a job unlike many “committed social reformers.” Ed]

Sabu, whose real name is Hector Monsegur, is unlikely to have many friends in Anonymous anyway after he turned into an FBI super-grass and started turning in members. A court  document, turned up by Reuters, describes how authorities agreed not to charge the hacker,, with a variety of crimes he allegedly committed as long as he obeyed the terms of his plea deal.

Monsegur, 28, was arrested at his small apartment in a Manhattan housing complex on June 7, 2011 and two months later pleaded guilty to 12 computer crimes, prosecutors. But the Anonymous leader's profile is fair from being the savoury character many would wish. Twice he was caught trying to hawk a combined total of five pounds of marijuana. In 2010, he owned a handgun that was not permitted in New York state and he also made $15,000 worth of unauthorised purchases on his then-employer's stolen credit card. He used the hot card to buy electronics and jewelry.

The deal he hatched with the prosecutors was that while the charges he faces carry up to 122-1/2 years in prison, with a mandatory minimum 2-year sentence, prosecutors would recommend a more lenient prison term provided he grassed up his mates.

Nick Farrell

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