Published in Processors

AMD explains the demise of Deccan



The butler did it


In the ultra-low power APU market, Brazos 2.0 is the new king and AMD has even elaborated what happened to the Deccan platform and Krishna/Wichita 28nm products.

The explanation is rather simple. AMD states that Krishna had two to four Bobcat cores and it was meant to fit the essential notebook, netbook, tablet, all-in-one and small desktop form factors.

The only explanation that AMD offers is that Krishna was “Planned for 28nm process manufacturing. and Replaced with “Brazos 2.0”. Since Brazos 2.0 is a 40nm part and in a real world just speeded up Brazos with a few new tricks, you get the point that 28nm transition was pushed back by about a year. Of course we are talking APUs and everyone knows by now that 28nm graphics has been shipping for a while.

The second fallen 28nm part was codenamed Wichita and was presented in early 2011, during AMD’s financial analysts’ call and included on the official roadmap for 2012 release.

Wichita had two to four Bobcat cores and it was meant for essential notebook, netbook, tablet, all-in-one and small desktop form factors.

The explanation why they dropped it remains the same. AMD states: “Planned for 28nm process manufacturing. Replaced with “Brazos 2.0”.”

Komodo six to ten-core cores desktop parts in 32nm, as well as Sepang and Terramar server parts, were also killed in action and replaced by some new kids on the block.

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