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Tuesday, 25 March 2008 10:38

Seagate claims SSD violates its patents

Written by test

Image

Might sue SSD makers

According to an interview on CNN with Seagate's CEO, Bill Watkins, Seagate is considering taking legal action against SSD manufacturers, as the company claims that they might be violating patents with regard to how storage devices are interfacing with the PC.

Bill Watkins also implied that Western Digital holds some of these patents and might consider similar action. However, this might only happen if SSD starts taking a large share of the hard drive manufacturers' market, which at the moment doesn't look like it's about to happen too soon.

Nonetheless, this is fight talk and we don't think companies such as Intel, SanDisk and Samsung will take kindly to these kind of statements. Bill Watkins was also ridiculing the price different between the 80GB hard drive-based MacBook Air and the 64GB SSD based model, as the price difference is no less than US$1,300, for which you get less storage space.

We believe that SSD still has a market place, as it offers a wide range of advantages over traditional hard drives, despite the fact that the hard drive manufacturers don't seem to agree.

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Last modified on Tuesday, 25 March 2008 15:38

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