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Tuesday, 10 January 2012 13:31

Microsoft creates Windows 7 own goal

Written by Nick Farell



Not like there is much competition


While Microsoft might have control of the desktop market and might get away with murder, it can't really do so in the mobile market where everything silly it does is likely to get a good kicking from the Tame Apple Press.

Take this week, Redmond published a new Windows Phone update, build 8107, to resolve a problem where the soft keyboard sometimes disappears, leaving users no way to type anything on the phone. Given that it stuffs up any handset on any carrier, so it should be rolled out to everyone damn fast, Redmond is not telling anyone when the roll out will happen.

In a blog post confirming the update had already started to roll out Eric Hautala, General Manager of "Customer Experience Engineering" at Microsoft, said that going forward, the company would no longer provide detailed information. While major feature updates will still be publicised, minor patches, security updates, stability improvements, bug fixes would be kept secret.

After all in a world with tough competition, Microsoft does not want to be seen as being more useful or better than its rivals.  Apple showed the world that being stupidly secret was the way forward. Typically Microsoft thinks that aspect of Jobs' Mob is a good idea to copy.

Nick Farell

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