Featured Articles

IHS teardown reveals Galaxy S5 BOM

IHS teardown reveals Galaxy S5 BOM

Research firm IHS got hold of Samsung’s new flagship smartphone and took it apart to the last bolt to figure out…

More...
Galaxy S5, HTC One M8 available selling well

Galaxy S5, HTC One M8 available selling well

Samsung’s Galaxy S5 has finally gone on sale and it can be yours for €699, which is quite a lot of…

More...
Intel lists Haswell refresh parts

Intel lists Haswell refresh parts

Intel has added a load of Haswell refresh parts to its official price list and there really aren’t any surprises to…

More...
Respawn confirms Titanfall DLC for May

Respawn confirms Titanfall DLC for May

During his appearance at PAX East panel and confirmed on Twitter, Titanfall developer Respawn confirmed that the first DLC pack for…

More...
KFA2 GTX 780 Ti Hall Of Fame reviewed

KFA2 GTX 780 Ti Hall Of Fame reviewed

KFA2 gained a lot of overclocking experience with the GTX 780 Hall of Fame (HOF), which we had a chance to…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Tuesday, 03 January 2012 14:15

Asustek cuts motherboard production

Written by Nick Farell



Motherboard stands for comfort


Asustek has decided to slash its motherboard production volume from 5-6 million units each quarter previously to only 3-3.5 million units in the first quarter of 2012.

According to Digitimes the outfit has pots of boards from the fourth quarter of 2011 which no one has bought yet. The news comes from upstream component makers and Asustek would not confirm the rumours. It seems that Asustek has a million motherboards left over from the fourth quarter.  It does not have to worry about stuffing up the company's sales target of the first quarter of 2012, but its  upstream component partners are a bit miffed.

Asustek's production cut has also affected its chipset orders to CPU makers. Chipset orders to Intel in the quarter dropped 2.5-2.8 million units with orders to AMD dropped 500,000-700,000 units. Asustek was a little unusual because while the other motherboard players cut back on inventory during the last quarter as demand fell  Asustek carried on producing boards. This stocked up its inventory level ad will mean that other motherboard players are expected to enjoy on-quarter shipment growths from 5-10 percent in the first quarter.

blog comments powered by Disqus

Comments  

 
+4 #1 jklauderdale 2012-01-03 15:22
Couldn't care less. I stopped using Asus mainboards after I tried to install G Skill RAM that I KNEW was good into one of their boards and it didn't work. I got an email back from Asus saying that they don't support that set of RAM so, if it didn't work, oh well. Been using Gigabyte boards since then and found them to be just as flawless and usually cheaper. Not to mention I've never had an issue with incompatible RAM :-|

Bottom Line: No one should be able to dictate what parts you can and can not use in a system you build yourself.
 
 
+1 #2 mrgerbik 2012-01-03 16:46
Quoting jklauderdale:
Bottom Line: No one should be able to dictate what parts you can and can not use in a system you build yourself.




I agree - but in all fairness, all motherboards that I know of have RAM QVL lists...

ASUS has definitely left a bad taste in my mouth with the last couple motherboards Ive owned - and I too had switched over to Gigabyte ... although i took one last chance with the Sabertooth 990FX and after mucking around with finicky settings for hours upon hours to get things working right, I finally got things stable and all seems well... the only reason I ditched Gigabyte this time around was because of UFEI (shallow I know) - next board will be a Gigabyte thou for sure
 
 
0 #3 Jurassic1024 2012-01-03 17:18
Quoting jklauderdale:
Couldn't care less. I stopped using Asus mainboards after I tried to install G Skill RAM that I KNEW was good into one of their boards and it didn't work.



You never said if you RMA'd and tried the kit you got back. QVL lists for RAM are only useful if you're paranoid.

I'm currently unning RipjawsX 8GB 1600MHz @ 1866MHz on ASUS P8P67 EVO right now, no problems ever. Before that i had Ripjaws 4GB 1600MHz kit on P5K-E 775 socket board, again no problems.

Only a fool would stop buying a product over one bad experience.
 
 
+1 #4 jklauderdale 2012-01-03 17:36
Quoting Jurassic1024:
Only a fool would stop buying a product over one bad experience.


I knew the RAM was good, I knew the motherboard functioned with my old 2X2GB Corsair kit. I stopped buying Asus for the same reason I don't purchase (or pirate) DRM laden games, on sheer principle.

Why buy from someone who leaves a bad taste in your mouth when there are cheaper and "friendlier" options available who are just as stable?
 
 
+1 #5 dicobalt 2012-01-03 20:51
Quoting jklauderdale:
Couldn't care less. I stopped using Asus mainboards after I tried to install G Skill RAM that I KNEW was good into one of their boards and it didn't work. I got an email back from Asus saying that they don't support that set of RAM so, if it didn't work, oh well. Been using Gigabyte boards since then and found them to be just as flawless and usually cheaper. Not to mention I've never had an issue with incompatible RAM :-|


If that board was brand new all you really had to do was wait for a BIOS update. In the meantime you could have relaxed the timing and bumped the voltage. I'm sure it would have worked. This is a common problem with all new motherboards. Especially when a new chipset is released.
 
 
0 #6 dicobalt 2012-01-03 20:53
Q1 is always slow and Q4 is always demanding. Doesn't this happen every year?
 
 
0 #7 karlsbad 2012-01-03 20:55
One reason they cut back has to be Intel's new plan of ditching processors after only one year or so. Now's the time on 'Sockets' vend vee d@nce!
The SB chipsets, are => important as the CPU. I.E. I have to have SATA3, PCIe 3, USB 3 and then, 3+ PCIe 16x slots, 8x, 4x, 400+ GB SSD Primary HD (which may do more for frame rates than a new video AIB), etc. You've probably guessed, I've been waiting for Ivy Bridge for a long long time. I really resent how Intel piecemeals features which don't have all that much to do with the CPU gen per se.
It's a real task to figure which motherboard uses what "old" codenamed chipset and CPU; it's what I wanted or the other flavor? I'm glad that Chipzilla is dropping kit quickly. When R.O.G. model names don't change with onboard spec -confusing.
 
 
0 #8 buxcador 2012-01-03 23:46
I blame Intel. By force to buy a new mother with each processor update, it makes the entire update too costly and risky.
 
 
0 #9 Bl0bb3r 2012-01-06 03:20
Well ASUX, that's what happens when your products quality drops and you neglect your users. Same thing goes for the other two.

I'm switching to ASRock from now, better deals that don't involve "charging a premium for quality".

And a big FU for not respecting my warranty, bitches!
 

To be able to post comments please log-in with Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments