Featured Articles

Intel releases tiny 3G cell modem

Intel releases tiny 3G cell modem

Intel has released a 3G cellular modem with an integrated power amplifier that fits into a 300 mm2 footprint, claiming it…

More...
Braswell 14nm Atom slips to Q2 15

Braswell 14nm Atom slips to Q2 15

It's not all rosy in the house of Intel. It seems that upcoming Atom out-of-order cores might be giving this semiconductor…

More...
TSMC 16nm wafers coming in Q1 2015

TSMC 16nm wafers coming in Q1 2015

TSMC will start producing 16nm wafers in the first quarter of 2015. Sometime in the second quarter production should ramp up…

More...
Skylake-S LGA is 35W to 95W TDP part

Skylake-S LGA is 35W to 95W TDP part

Skylake-S is the ‘tock’ of the Haswell architecture and despite being delayed from the original plan, this desktop part is scheduled…

More...
Aerocool Dead Silence reviewed

Aerocool Dead Silence reviewed

Aerocool is well known for its gamer cases with aggressive styling. However, the Dead Silence chassis offers consumers a new choice,…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Monday, 12 December 2011 12:37

Google rolls out Ipv6 for itself

Written by Nick Farell



The rest of the world can wait


Google has rolled out Ipv6 across its internal networks as the world starts to run out of Ipv4 addresses.

The search engine outfit was expecting to have rolled out Ipv6 ages ago but according to IT World it took a lot longer than company engineers anticipated. Google network engineer Irena Nikolova told  Usenix Large Installation System Administration (LISA) conference that an IPv6 migration involves more than just updating the software and hardware. She said it requires buy-in from management and staff, particularly administrators who already are juggling too many tasks.

Early adopters need to spend shedloads of time working with vendors to get them to fix buggy and still-unfinished code. Things that should be supported often turn out to not work, she said. The project, which has been under way for about four years and is only half way finished. But the company has made significant gains in this time. About 95 percent of Google's engineers now have IPv6 access on their desks. Eventually, the company plans to have an IPv6-only network.

Nick Farell

E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
blog comments powered by Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments