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Wednesday, 02 November 2011 09:17

Does Origin EULA allow spying on players?

Written by David Stellmack

ea

EA denies the complaints coming from Germany

German gamers are up in arms over the Electronic Arts Origin end-user licensing agreement, which they believe gives EA the ability to spy on players. The terms seem to allow EA to access other EA products that are installed on the user’s system without letting the user know.

In addition, the information accessed apparently can be tied to the individual user and can be used for targeted marketing purposes. EA can also apparently share data that does not identify the user with third party service providers.

EA denies that Origin is spyware and they claim that they do not install spyware on the PCs of users that buy their products. They also claim that Origin has no access to anything other than stuff related to Origin and EA software, that the software has no access to a user’s personal files or documents.

EA claims that the license agreement is in line with industry standards and accepted industry privacy policies. Still, users seem worried, which isn’t good for EA.


Last modified on Wednesday, 02 November 2011 09:54
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