Featured Articles

Nvidia Shield 2 shows up in AnTuTu

Nvidia Shield 2 shows up in AnTuTu

Nvidia’s original Shield console launched last summer to mixed reviews. It went on sale in the US and so far Nvidia…

More...
AMD CSO John Byrne talks ARM

AMD CSO John Byrne talks ARM

We had a chance to talk about AMD’s upcoming products with John Byrne, Chief Sales Officer, AMD. We covered a number…

More...
AMD Chief Sales Officer thinks GPU leadership is critical

AMD Chief Sales Officer thinks GPU leadership is critical

We had a chance to talk to John Byrne who spent the last two years as Senior Vice President and Chief…

More...
OpenPlus One $299 5.5-inch Full HD phone

OpenPlus One $299 5.5-inch Full HD phone

OnePlus is one of the few small companies that might disrupt the Android phone market, dominated by giant outfits like Samsung.…

More...
KFA2 GTX 780 Ti Hall Of Fame reviewed

KFA2 GTX 780 Ti Hall Of Fame reviewed

KFA2 gained a lot of overclocking experience with the GTX 780 Hall of Fame (HOF), which we had a chance to…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Monday, 17 October 2011 11:09

Boffins develop phones that can reinvent themselves

Written by Nick Farell



If only this worked with customers


Boffins at Northwestern University in the US are using nanomaterials to create mobile gear that can rewire itself. The big idea is that in the future mobile devices may be able to reconfigure themselves to meet new demands.

How the boffins have done this is by creating a nanomaterial that can “steer” electrical currents. The discovery could lead to the development of smartphones and devices that can reconfigure their internal ‘wiring’ and evolve into an entirely different and new device, to reflect the changing needs of punters.

Apparently there is a barrier forming where materials from which the circuits are constructed begin to lose their properties and are more likely to be controlled by quantum mechanical phenomena. This causes a problem because all these quantum potentually dead and alive cats get into the phone and start sticking their paws onto the circuitry. To get around this problem scientists have begun building circuits in three dimensions, by stacking components on top of one another.

But another method is to make reconfigurable electronic materials that can rearrange themselves to meet different computational needs at different times. The team is wants to create a single device able to reconfigure itself into a resistor, a rectifier, a diode and a transistor based on signals from a computer. The multi-dimensional circuitry could be reconfigured into new electronic circuits using a varied input sequence of electrical pulses, the team said.

Nick Farell

E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
blog comments powered by Disqus

Comments  

 
+1 #1 Jigar 2011-10-17 11:56
This will stay in the labs, companies want us to buy new gadgets forever, this will just burn their shop...

Cheap shot: Apple shops will be first to close if this happens. :P
 
 
-2 #2 fteoath64 2011-10-17 11:58
"multi-dimensional circuitry" using such an exotic term to really mean what ?. Why not biological infused DNA strains that makes the circuit alive and an invited consciousness that becomes sentient ?.

Wold this mean that a bad person using such a device will be bitten by it ?.
 
 
0 #3 dimz 2011-10-17 23:50
Quoting Jigar:
This will stay in the labs, companies want us to buy new gadgets forever, this will just burn their shop...

Cheap shot: Apple shops will be first to close if this happens. :P

Maybe, but there's also the chance we'll be buying stuff either cheaper and be charged a premium for the upgrade codes for the device to self-upgrade to the new hardware or pay more up-front and spend smaller amounts in the long run for upgrades, like the way it works now with smartphone apps.
 

To be able to post comments please log-in with Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments