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Monday, 03 October 2011 13:43

New Zealand bans power hungry PCs

Written by Nick Farell


Maximum energy use limits
New Zealand has decided to ban all PCs and laptops which use too much electrcitity.

Under the new compulsory energy use rules PCs and laptops that did not meet the standards would not be able to be legally sold, leased or hired in New Zealand. However the government has admitted that he impact will be minimal as technology to reduce energy consumption, including high-efficiency internal power supply units, was already available.

Recent testing in Australia had found no correlation between the price and the energy efficiency of computers. EECA estimated using an energy-efficient computer and monitor would save about $33 in power costs a year, and by 2025 cumulative savings to households and businesses would be more than $260m.

Computer importers had been involved with EECA's Energy Star programme for a while and already had models that would meet the proposed standard.  However it is not clear what will happen to home builders who buy components that suck up juice.  It is likely that they could be prosecuted for selling them on.

Nick Farell

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Comments  

 
0 #1 Marburg_U 2011-10-03 15:35
Ron Paul 2012 even for New Zealand.
 
 
+4 #2 joe pineapples 2011-10-03 15:48
Wonder what the max usage for one pc will be. Thinking about it, you might have someone with one pc @90watts, who leave it on 24/7, and another user @350watts with 24hrs usage out of any week.
 
 
+2 #3 nt300 2011-10-03 17:18
This is complete nonsense. How about Power Users with super OC'ed gaming PC's that run for about 2 to 3 hours worth of gaming? Or just like the poster posted above mine, how you have low power PC's running 24/7 nonstop?
This is just like the ridiculous Toilets with fewer litres per flush which we have here in North America. The problem with this is most of the time you are forced to flush 2 to 3 times to ensure the "SOMETHING" get's properly flushed down. You end up using 2 to 3 times more water than originally when you only had to flush once, because that once had enough flow to flush the bloody "SOMETHING" down.

This is the problem when Government tries to legislate common sense.
 
 
+1 #4 012013014 2011-10-03 17:40
all of the government in any country is the same. 33$ a year ? dude, u can just import a little less shit or dont build any unnecessary building u can save more than 33$ a year(per person)...most of the time ,stupid idea always accepted ..wth they are doing in the parliamen? eating nachos? hey how about making a pc run on cow crap? u like that? what a nonsense....
 
 
+1 #5 jguernsey 2011-10-03 18:21
Good thing I live in the U.S.A.
 
 
0 #6 Fierce Guppy 2011-10-03 18:49
It's simply another way for the New Zealand government to increase revenue by intoducing compliance costs on retailers and I expect the legislation would fall under the Resource Manage Act which is like a leech infested pond with the private sector as the feeble looking sheep standing in the middle of it.

Hey, I just got myself a GTX 590. What ya gonna do about it, Eddie Thompson? You government parasite.
 
 
+2 #7 123s 2011-10-03 19:43
I dont see how it is a bad thing as long the limit is reasonable...
 
 
+2 #8 Kakkoii 2011-10-03 21:14
Quoting nt300:
This is complete nonsense. How about Power Users with super OC'ed gaming PC's that run for about 2 to 3 hours worth of gaming? Or just like the poster posted above mine, how you have low power PC's running 24/7 nonstop?


The law doesn't say anything about personally built gaming computers. It merely states that complete machines that don't meet the energy standards cannot be SOLD/leased/hired. You can still buy parts and make your own, which is the smart way to go always. Or else you can just order a computer online from somewhere else, since they can't regulate that.
 
 
+1 #9 Kryojenix 2011-10-03 21:53
I leave my high-powered computer on all the time, but I forego room heating! :P
Seriously though, even my computer runs at lower power when I'm not actually gaming (I don't do protein folding sims or anything, just bittorrent seeding!)
 
 
+1 #10 LinuxUser 2011-10-03 23:38
Either:
a) This is complete nonsense, which is most likely; or
b) this has been around for ages.
Please give a source for you pile on trash when you can in the future :D
 

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