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Friday, 16 September 2011 09:06

No Flash support in next IE

Written by David Stellmack
internet_explorer_logo

Will drop plug-in support going forward
Microsoft appears to be committed to taking a page out of Apple’s playbook by choosing to drop support for Adobe Flash in the next version of Internet Explorer. Instead, similar to Apple, the company will be throwing its support behind HTML5. This is the direction Microsoft is apparently heading with Internet Explorer 10.

Another big change when Internet Explorer 10 arrives is that the company will be dropping support for plug-ins, at least in one version of IE 10. We don’t expect this news to be popular with many companies and web developers who have already invested significant monies in building web sites that need these plug-ins. A second version of Internet Explorer 10 will be available that will have standard plug-in support, but expect the one without the plug-in support to become the standard.

The decision to move in this direction also appears to have a lot to do with the new Metro interface that is a part of Windows 8. Metro is built to use the HTML5 as well as much of the new technology that is a part of what many hope the modern web will be going forward.

Adobe is apparently making the move to insure compatibility going forward by moving their technology and adapting it to use HTML5.  Of course, this transition will take time, but Adobe is apparently hedging its bets and building tools to export its Flash media into other formats.

David Stellmack

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