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Monday, 12 September 2011 13:35

Android moves to x86

Written by Nick Farell
google_logo_new

Google to officially support it
While everyone has been getting moist about the prospect of Windows running on Arm chips, it turns out that Google also has an interesting adaptation in the works.

Google is apparently about to officially support Intel’s x86 systems with Android. This will mean an end of adaption software which has been trying to do the same thing with varying success.

Google TV runs on devices with Intel chips, and Google TV is based on Android, but that software is only shadow Android product. Intel is promising that Google Android 2.3 Gingerbread will be available for Intel Atom E6xx series processors in January, 2012. Gingerbread is the same version of Android designed to run on smartphones.

One thing that observers have noted is that Intel is not talking about later versions of Android such as Honeycomb or Ice Cream Sandwich. This might mean that Google and Intel are being a little more cautious about allowing Android tablets to run on Intel chips. We can't think why.


Last modified on Monday, 12 September 2011 15:15

Nick Farell

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