Featured Articles

IHS teardown reveals Galaxy S5 BOM

IHS teardown reveals Galaxy S5 BOM

Research firm IHS got hold of Samsung’s new flagship smartphone and took it apart to the last bolt to figure out…

More...
Galaxy S5, HTC One M8 available selling well

Galaxy S5, HTC One M8 available selling well

Samsung’s Galaxy S5 has finally gone on sale and it can be yours for €699, which is quite a lot of…

More...
Intel lists Haswell refresh parts

Intel lists Haswell refresh parts

Intel has added a load of Haswell refresh parts to its official price list and there really aren’t any surprises to…

More...
Respawn confirms Titanfall DLC for May

Respawn confirms Titanfall DLC for May

During his appearance at PAX East panel and confirmed on Twitter, Titanfall developer Respawn confirmed that the first DLC pack for…

More...
KFA2 GTX 780 Ti Hall Of Fame reviewed

KFA2 GTX 780 Ti Hall Of Fame reviewed

KFA2 gained a lot of overclocking experience with the GTX 780 Hall of Fame (HOF), which we had a chance to…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Thursday, 04 August 2011 11:00

Social networking makes us ruder

Written by Nick Farell
y_globe

Too much collaboration going on
Too much gear for collaboration, social networking and communication tools is making people ruder, according to a new survey from some ginks working for a “social email provider” harmon.ie.

The study found that during face-to-face meetings, 41 per cent of UK workers remain glued to their communication devices, sending instant messages, responding to texts, listening to voicemails or checking their emails. This figure rises to a staggering 70 percent during virtual meetings and webcasts.

Only a third even admit to disrupting face-to-face meetings to answer their mobile phones even when 40 per cent agree it is rude, One in three workers aged 20-39 will take a mobile phone call while in a meeting, compared to one in five of us older types over 40.Only ten percent of those over 60 would dream of it. Nineteen percent of respondents tell their superiors to sod off and stay connected when they’ve been told to explicitly disconnect.

David Lavenda, Vice President of Product Strategy at harmon.ie said people had double standards in the workplace, with 82 per cent complaining about other peoples’ tendencies to disrupt proceedings by answering a mobile phone, tweeting, sending an instant message, responding to emails or even just updating their social status.  More than 70 per cent of those that rudely interrupt meetings themselves would be offended if someone did the same thing to them. Clearly, the perceived pressure to stay connected has led many people to neglect their manners.”

Could it be that the rest of the human race are just self absorbed tossers who only think about their own short term satisfaction? Or is that just me being rude again?


Nick Farell

E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
blog comments powered by Disqus

Comments  

 
+1 #1 Alterecho 2011-08-04 13:58
Quote:
The study found that during face-to-face meetings, 41 per cent of UK workers remain glued to their communication devices, sending instant messages, responding to texts, listening to voicemails or checking their emails
a third even admit to disrupting face-to-face meetings to answer their mobile phones


One of the reasons why i don't like having the friends i have over to my place or going to theirs or even have company.
 
 
0 #2 Fierce Guppy 2011-08-05 07:16
"Nineteen percent of respondents tell their superiors to sod off and stay connected when they’ve been told to explicitly disconnect."

Whoah... Never seen anything like that before. In New Zealand employees would most likely receive a warning. Third time and you're gone.
 

To be able to post comments please log-in with Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments