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Wednesday, 06 July 2011 13:10

US Army's multi-billion-dollar computer does not work

Written by Nick Farell


Would have been better buying off the peg hardware
The US's multi-billion-dollar military computer system which was supposed to help the US Army in Iraq and Afghanistan doesn’t work and even if it did would not have been as good as an off-the-peg server system.

DCGS-A is meant to gather intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance, and provide real-time battlefield analysis and the current location of high-value targets. In fact it those who tried to use it said that it caused more problems than it was worth. A memo sent by Major General Michael Flynn said that the DCGS-A was as useful as a chocolate teapot. Analysits could not provide their commanders a full understanding of the operational environment. He said that without a full understanding of the enemy and human terrain, US operations are not as successful as they could be. This shortfall translates into operational opportunities missed and lives lost.

Politicians suggested that the US Army to consider switching to another, proven system that the FBI and CIA use: Palantir. However the Army refused, and instead rolled out a software update that was meant to fix any problems. But the system was still unusable because you couldn’t share the data, the system is “prone to crashes and frequently goes off-line.”

Extreme Tech said that any commercial solution out there would be better.

 

Nick Farell

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Comments  

 
+10 #1 yourma2000 2011-07-06 13:16
Probably bought DDR2 memory, needed DDR3 :P
 
 
+30 #2 fuadzilla 2011-07-06 13:22
is it intel inside? :D
 
 
-25 #3 JEskandari 2011-07-06 18:08
Quoting fuadzilla:
is it intel inside? :D

my guess the problem is AMD graphic card
or perhaps low quality HDMI cable they
used :lol:
 
 
+23 #4 Haberlandt 2011-07-06 19:31
Quoting JEskandari:
Quoting fuadzilla:
is it intel inside? :D

my guess the problem is AMD graphic card
or perhaps low quality HDMI cable they
used :lol:










Lol Fail.
 
 
+8 #5 Cartman 2011-07-07 05:00
Maybe someone should mention that price of that shit is $2.7 billion dollars... i mean cummmon whan could be worth that much???

1 million would e too much now you can see how army is spending money
 

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