Featured Articles

Analysts expect ARM to do well next year

Analysts expect ARM to do well next year

British chip designer ARM could cash in on the mobile industry's rush to transition to 64-bit operating systems and hardware.

More...
Huawei and Xiaomi outpace Lenovo, LG in smartphone market

Huawei and Xiaomi outpace Lenovo, LG in smartphone market

Samsung has lost smartphone market share, ending the quarter on a low note and Xiaomi appears to be the big winner.

More...
Intel Broadwell 15W coming to CES

Intel Broadwell 15W coming to CES

It looks like Intel will be showing off its 14nm processors, codenames Broadwell, in a couple of weeks at CES 2015.

More...
Gainward GTX 980 Phantom reviewed

Gainward GTX 980 Phantom reviewed

Today we’ll be taking a closer look at the recently introduced Gainward GTX 980 4GB with the company’s trademark Phantom cooler.

More...
Zotac ZBOX Sphere OI520 barebones vs Sphere Plus review

Zotac ZBOX Sphere OI520 barebones vs Sphere Plus review

Zotac has been in the nettop and mini-PC space for more than four years now and it has managed to carve…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Wednesday, 06 July 2011 13:10

US Army's multi-billion-dollar computer does not work

Written by Nick Farell


Would have been better buying off the peg hardware
The US's multi-billion-dollar military computer system which was supposed to help the US Army in Iraq and Afghanistan doesn’t work and even if it did would not have been as good as an off-the-peg server system.

DCGS-A is meant to gather intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance, and provide real-time battlefield analysis and the current location of high-value targets. In fact it those who tried to use it said that it caused more problems than it was worth. A memo sent by Major General Michael Flynn said that the DCGS-A was as useful as a chocolate teapot. Analysits could not provide their commanders a full understanding of the operational environment. He said that without a full understanding of the enemy and human terrain, US operations are not as successful as they could be. This shortfall translates into operational opportunities missed and lives lost.

Politicians suggested that the US Army to consider switching to another, proven system that the FBI and CIA use: Palantir. However the Army refused, and instead rolled out a software update that was meant to fix any problems. But the system was still unusable because you couldn’t share the data, the system is “prone to crashes and frequently goes off-line.”

Extreme Tech said that any commercial solution out there would be better.

 

Nick Farell

E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
blog comments powered by Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments