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Monday, 04 July 2011 13:04

First security scam at Google+

Written by Nick Farell


Surprise, surprise
It did not take long but insecurity outfit Sophos is already reporting a  Google's social notworking site Google+ is suffering from a scam attack.

Spammers are sending out bogus Google+ invitations which in fact link to online pharmacies. The messages look very similar to the real emails that people may receive from friends who are already members of Google+, asking them to check out the site to learn more. Clicking on the links will not take users through to the new social networking site, but instead will take browsers to the Canadian Family Pharmacy.

Graham Cluley, senior technology consultant at Sophos said spammers are no doubt hoping that the email will be hard to resist, as many people are eager to see what is being billed as Google's answer to Facebook.

"It's unclear just how many users will be tempted to buy drugs online, however research shows that last year alone, 36 million Americans bought drugs from online pharmacies, so this is a technique that is clearly continuing to work for spammers."

Cluely said that you should never click on links in unsolicited emails.

Nick Farell

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