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Thursday, 16 June 2011 11:55

Users divided on LulzSec attacks

Written by Nick Farell
y_globe

Only half of the world thinks they are funny
LulzSec latest wave of attacks split internet users as over half admit they find LulzSec internet attacks amusing. A post to LulzSec's Twitter feed  confirmed the outfit's participation in the attack on the CIA website yesterday, and is one of a long catalogue of attacks in the last few weeks by LulzSec.

LulzSec claims to be exposing security vulnerabilities in websites and organisations for "fun", but a poll conducted yesterday by Sophos discovered that internet users are divided in opinion. Namely, 43 percent say hacking into companies is no laughing matter, whereas over 50 percent find some amusement in the hacks.

Graham Cluley, senior technology consultant at Sophos said that while some people think this is a fun game that can also help point out corporate security weaknesses, the truth is that companies and innocent customers are having their personal data exposed. He said that there was a responsible way to inform a business that its website is insecure, or that it has not properly protected its data. He finds it disturbing is that so many internet users appear to support LulzSec.

Crucially, a denial of service attack - like that which appears to have hit the CIA website - is against the law. You have to ask yourself if LulzSec has finally bitten off more than it can chew. After all, they've just poked a very grizzly bear with a pointy stick. LulzSec's cockiness may be their undoing," added Cluley.


Nick Farell

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