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Friday, 15 February 2008 10:42

UK P2P law might create legal difficulties

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ISPs ask for liability protection


A draft
plan to take broadband away from P2P pirates in the U.K. might mean that ISPs need some protection from being sued.

The ISPs fear that if they, or the Record and Music companies, get the wrong person they could be sued for taking away a service from a legitimate user. They have told the U.K. government considering the law that they need protection if such a law is brought in.

They want the record companies or whoever else wrongly identified the file sharers to pay out any such cases. The Record and Music Industry has famously made some horrendous mistakes when identifying P2P pirates and the ISPs fear they could be saddled with the legal bill for their mistakes.

However, the the British Phonographic Industry disagrees and wants the ISPs to simply use their Terms of Service to disconnect people.
Last modified on Sunday, 17 February 2008 00:40

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