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Wednesday, 13 February 2008 10:45

Vista Capable label doubtful

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Microsoft staff admits


A plan
to label machines "Windows Vista Capable" was considered a little doubtful by Microsoft staff, according to court papers.

The information filed in the U.S. District Court, is part of a case which accusesg Microsoft of unfairly and incorrectly labelling machines as "Windows Vista Capable." While the machines could run the cut-down Vista Home Basic they could not really do anything that was much different from Windows XP.

Microsoft claimed at the time it provided customers with enough information about Vista, however some internal Microsoft e-mails voiced the doubts of senior-level Microsoft employees over the issue. Mike Nash, currently a Corporate Vice President for Windows Product Management, wrote in one of the emails that he got burned by the program and was stuck with a $2,100 e-mail machine.

Jim Allchin, then the Co-President of Microsoft's Platforms and Services Division, wrote in another e-mail that Microsoft botched this and that Microsoft had to do a better job with its customers.

More here.

Last modified on Thursday, 14 February 2008 04:00

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