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Monday, 23 May 2011 10:10

AMD introduces new G-series embedded APUs

Written by Fudzilla staff


TDPs starting at just 5.5 watts
AMD has launched two new embedded G-series APUs, with impressive 5.5W and 6.4W TDPs. The processors have a 39 percent lower energy footprint than their predecessors and they are based on the Bobcat core.

The T40E is a dual-core clocked at 1GHz, with 1MB of L2 cache and HD 6250 graphics. It supports LVDDR3-1066 memory and has a 6.4W TDP. It loosely resembles a low-power variant of the C-50 APU used in Acer’s Iconia W500 tablet.

The T40R is a single core 1GHz part, with a 5.5W TDP. The graphics and memory controller are the same as in the dual-core T40E.

Thanks to the low TDPs, the new processors can be used without active cooling. Interestingly, Axiomtek has introduced a Pico-ITX motherboard based on T40 parts, which is quite impressive for a dual-core processor with DX11 capable graphics.
Last modified on Monday, 23 May 2011 10:43
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Comments  

 
+14 #1 MrScary 2011-05-23 10:28
Asus’ Iconia...is ACER ICONIA
 
 
+13 #2 nele 2011-05-23 10:43
Quoting MrScary:
Asus’ Iconia...is ACER ICONIA


Ooops :lol:
 
 
+9 #3 fuadzilla 2011-05-23 13:17
slim and sexy! arrrr......
 
 
-6 #4 mrgerbik 2011-05-23 18:34
I would consider myself and AMD fanboi, but this naming scheme SUCKS... T40R and T40E??? Just as I was getting used to the A, E, and C series... can they make it any more obscure?
 
 
+5 #5 JAB Creations 2011-05-23 19:36
Quoting mrgerbik:
can they make it any more obscure?


The low-end of the CPU spectrum isn't intended for upgrades really beyond the hard drive and RAM. When you're talking about $350 and below for an entire laptop/netbook you have to shed options to get to that price point, everyone still has to make a profit to stay in business.
 
 
+3 #6 mrgerbik 2011-05-24 00:57
Quoting JAB Creations:
Quoting mrgerbik:
can they make it any more obscure?


The low-end of the CPU spectrum isn't intended for upgrades really beyond the hard drive and RAM. When you're talking about $350 and below for an entire laptop/netbook you have to shed options to get to that price point, everyone still has to make a profit to stay in business.


what does that have to do with the naming scheme?

I was just pointing out that for people who don't have the time to investigate and know CPU names, it may be confusing. Once this lineup of procs come out and we can see the whole Fusion list in all its glory, the confusion will slowly subside, but until then...
 
 
0 #7 hoohoo 2011-05-25 02:20
Quoting mrgerbik:
Quoting JAB Creations:
Quoting mrgerbik:
can they make it any more obscure?


The low-end of the CPU spectrum isn't intended for upgrades really beyond the hard drive and RAM. ...


what does that have to do with the naming scheme? ...



You will not be seeing these things in normal consumer products where you can upgrade the CPU. Think: industrial apps, maybe set top boxes, and so on. Sure you could search out the h/w and do a build on your own but if you are willing to go to that trouble, keeping track of two more Bobcat parts will not be very onerous.
 

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