Featured Articles

AMD SVP John Byrne named turnaround exec of the year

AMD SVP John Byrne named turnaround exec of the year

Director of AMD’s PR Chris Hook has tweeted and confirmed later in a conversation with Fudzilla that John Byrne, Senior Vice…

More...
Shield Tablet 8 launching on Tuesday July 22nd

Shield Tablet 8 launching on Tuesday July 22nd

We knew the date for a while but as of right now we can confirm that Nvidia’s new Shield Tablet 8,…

More...
AMD confirms 20nm in 2015

AMD confirms 20nm in 2015

Lisa Su, Senior Vice President and Chief Operating Officer, AMD, has confirmed what we told you back in May 2014 – …

More...
AMD reports loss, shares tumble

AMD reports loss, shares tumble

AMD’s debt load is causing huge problems for the chipmaker -- this quarter it had another substantial loss. The tame Apple Press…

More...
AMD A8-7600 Kaveri APU reviewed

AMD A8-7600 Kaveri APU reviewed

Today we'll take a closer look at AMD's A8-7600 APU Kaveri APU, more specifically we'll examine the GPU performance you can…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Tuesday, 19 April 2011 10:28

Apple asks a judge to throw out an anti-trust allegation

Written by Nick Farell


Because we said so
Lawyers for Jobs' Mob have asked a Judge to throw out a court case which claims it used DRM to control the music market.

Apple used FairPlay to encoding of digital music files ensured that songs bought through iTunes would play only on iPods and not other music players. In July 2004, RealNetworks released software called Harmony that was designed to crack through FairPlay's DRM and allow its own digital music files to play on the iPod.

Steve Jobs decided to update the iPod in October and rendering RealNetworks' content unplayable. The lawsuit claims that Apple's use of FairPlay allowed it to maintain a monopoly over both digital audio players and music downloads.

Apple insists that blocking of downloads that used competitors' software was designed to improve iTunes customers' experience and it knows what was best for them. Apple felt iPods worked better when consumers use the iTunes jukebox rather than third-party software that can cause corruption or other problems. Apparently that argument is all Apple thinks is required to go for a dismissal of the case.  To put the argument into perspective.  That is like Microsoft saying that its Internet Explorer was much better than Firefox so it had to be on the operating system.

Nick Farell

E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
blog comments powered by Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments