Featured Articles

Analysts expect ARM to do well next year

Analysts expect ARM to do well next year

British chip designer ARM could cash in on the mobile industry's rush to transition to 64-bit operating systems and hardware.

More...
Huawei and Xiaomi outpace Lenovo, LG in smartphone market

Huawei and Xiaomi outpace Lenovo, LG in smartphone market

Samsung has lost smartphone market share, ending the quarter on a low note and Xiaomi appears to be the big winner.

More...
Intel Broadwell 15W coming to CES

Intel Broadwell 15W coming to CES

It looks like Intel will be showing off its 14nm processors, codenames Broadwell, in a couple of weeks at CES 2015.

More...
Gainward GTX 980 Phantom reviewed

Gainward GTX 980 Phantom reviewed

Today we’ll be taking a closer look at the recently introduced Gainward GTX 980 4GB with the company’s trademark Phantom cooler.

More...
Zotac ZBOX Sphere OI520 barebones vs Sphere Plus review

Zotac ZBOX Sphere OI520 barebones vs Sphere Plus review

Zotac has been in the nettop and mini-PC space for more than four years now and it has managed to carve…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Friday, 15 April 2011 12:10

Intel to release Many Integrated Core using 22nm soon

Written by Nick Farell
intel_logo_new

Will have 100 MIC developer sites by Christmas
Intel plans to launch its first Many Integrated Core (MIC) using its upcoming 22nm process technology. Chipzilla said that it also expects to have more than 100 developer sites for MIC by the end of 2011.

The add-on accelerators Intel MIC micro-architecture provides are  expected to be used for highly parallel applications in high performance computing segments such as scientific exploration and research and weather modeling. But like AMD FireStream or Nvidia Tesla, Intel does not want its technology to replace processors  but be used to speed up certain applications.

Intel insists that x86 compatibility with x86 will give MIC  unique advantages. Kirk Skaugen, vice president of the Intel architecture group and general manager of Intel's data center group, during his keynote at the Intel Developer Forum (IDF) said that a MIC would be like a co-processor where you can use the same compilers, the same tools, the same VTunesthat power around 90 per cent of the Top 500 computers.

The next generation you run the compiler, it will optimise the workloads for the Intel cores, that are in the Xeon CPUs, and it will optimize on these new PCI Express cards that will have more than 50 cores and be on our 22nm process technology. So it will automatically balance that workload for the highest-parallel workloads on the planet, he promised.

So far Intel has supplied code-named Knights Ferry MIC test platform to select developers and plans to expand the number of developers, who can have the hardware, to one hundred by the end of 2011.


blog comments powered by Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments