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Thursday, 24 March 2011 11:07

Dell rolls out microservers

Written by Nick Farell


Low power chips for commerical datacentres
Computer maker Dell has rolled out two new microservers that are fitted with low-power energy efficient processors from Intel and AMD.

Dell said that the PowerEdge C5125 and C5220 were designed to allow companies to set up cloud computing infrastructures. Writing in his bog Dell's Barton George said that the C5125 will be based on AMD processors and will be launched next month while the Intel based C5220 will be available in May. The PowerEdge microservers have a dense 3U infrastructure that stuffs 12 one-socket servers that can be used for running one application. The servers use four times less space, racks and cabling which makes data centres more economic.

“These systems further save on power and cooling by leveraging shared infrastructure. The server nodes in the chassis share mechanicals, high-efficiency fans and redundant power supplies all of which helps it save up to 75 per cent in cooling costs compared to typical 1U servers,” George said.

Microservers are targeted towards commercial mainstream users instead of large enterprises and are being trialed by the likes of Facebook

Nick Farell

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