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Thursday, 27 January 2011 11:26

New York Times wants to set up an internal Wikileaks

Written by Nick Farell
y_globe

Leakage good for business
Apple's unpaid press office, the New York Times says that it wants to set up something like Wikileaks within its own server system. Apparently the paper has discovered that there is some jolly good information to be had if people are allowed to leak anonymously.

Executive editor Bill Keller told The Cutline that it might work like Al Jazeera's  Transparency Unit. "A small group from computer-assisted reporting and interactive news, with advice from the investigative unit and the legal department, has been discussing options for creating a kind of EZ Pass lane for leakers," Keller said.

Earlier this month, the Qatar-based network essentially created a WikiLeaks-style "anonymous electronic drop box" but with the promise of vetting by a news organization.  Like WikiLeaks, the Al Jazeera Transparency Unit allows users to submit files through an encrypted system that does not record any of their personal information.

So far it has published more than 1,700 classified files in the network's possession, part of the biggest classified leak related to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict.


Nick Farell

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