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Wednesday, 26 January 2011 11:03

IBM and Intel to show off new chips at ISSCC

Written by Nick Farell


Cutting-edge sharpened
Intel and IBM will show off their high-end server processors, which may contain cutting-edge technologies that could ultimately be found in future PC and server chips at the International Solid State Circuit Conference (ISSCC), which will be held in San Francisco Feb. 20-24 Chipzilla appears to want to show off its next-generation Itanium chip code-named Poulson, an eight-core processor that includes 50MB cache, according to an advance program announcement.

IBM will make a presentation about its zEnterprise 196 quad-core server chip, which runs at 5.2GHz and is already shipping with the company's zEnterprise mainframe systems. While all these chips have been announced,  few details have been given out and no one has seen one working. The IBM chip is on the ISSCC agenda as having the "highest frequency in microprocessor history." The chip uses 1.4 billion transistors and includes 30MB of cache.

Intel's  Poulson chip will succeed the existing Itanium processors code-named Tukwila, which started shipping in February last year after numerous delays.

Nick Farell

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