Featured Articles

Analyst reveals Apple Watch spec

Analyst reveals Apple Watch spec

An analyst has examined the Apple Watch supply chain in an effort to ascertain the exact spec of Cupertino’s new gadget…

More...
Nvidia's first 20nm product is a mobile SoC

Nvidia's first 20nm product is a mobile SoC

For much of the year we were under the impression that the second generation Maxwell will end up as a 20nm…

More...
Nvidia GTX 980 reviewed

Nvidia GTX 980 reviewed

Nvidia has released two new graphics cards based on its latest Maxwell GPU architecture. The Geforce GTX 970 and Geforce GTX…

More...
Nvidia adjusts GTX 980 and GTX 970 pricing

Nvidia adjusts GTX 980 and GTX 970 pricing

It appears that Nvidia has been feeling the pulse of the market and took some note from comments regarding the original…

More...
PowerColor TurboDuo R9 285 reviewed

PowerColor TurboDuo R9 285 reviewed

Today we will take a look at the PowerColor TurboDuo Radeon R9 285. The card is based on AMD’s new…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Monday, 10 January 2011 13:29

US welfare computer system close to meltdown

Written by Nick Farell


Fixing it would be socialism
The US Welfare system, which face it is fairly ephemeral, is about to slow down to a stop because its  computer system is about to go into overload.

The Social Security Administration (SSA) is desperate to move to a new data centre,  but the existing software is proving too difficult to update. A recent report by the agency's inspector general Patrick O'Carroll said that the department is grappling with a host of IT infrastructure projects and it is getting beaten to a pulp.

The department needs to replace the SSA's National Computer Center (NCC) which was built in 1979 in the next few years. So far it has been given $500 million so far to replace the outdated centre, But it is being seen as too little, to late and it is believed that it will break down by 2012. However, new centre will not be ready until 2015

Part of the problem is that the majority of the code that the department relies on is penned in COBOL. Replacing them has been deemed "too risky", so the SSA must figure out a way to restructure them to modernise the applications.

Nick Farell

E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
blog comments powered by Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments