Featured Articles

Android Wear installed on 50-100k phones

Android Wear installed on 50-100k phones

Android Wear is a companion app that you need in order to run your new Android Wear watch.

More...
AMD launches 45W desktop Kaveri parts, finally

AMD launches 45W desktop Kaveri parts, finally

AMD has finally launched three 45W Kaveri SKUs, which were in the works for months. The three chips feature configurable TDP,…

More...
Desktop Broadwell LGA is Socket 1150

Desktop Broadwell LGA is Socket 1150

Broadwell was supposed to come in 2014 and it will ship in the last quarter of this year for detachable thin…

More...
Nvidia officially launches the 8-inch Shield Tablet

Nvidia officially launches the 8-inch Shield Tablet

As expected and reported earlier, Nvidia has now officially announced its newest Shield device, the new 8-inch Shield Tablet. While the…

More...
Aerocool Dead Silence reviewed

Aerocool Dead Silence reviewed

Aerocool is well known for its gamer cases with aggressive styling. However, the Dead Silence chassis offers consumers a new choice,…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Monday, 10 January 2011 13:29

US welfare computer system close to meltdown

Written by Nick Farell


Fixing it would be socialism
The US Welfare system, which face it is fairly ephemeral, is about to slow down to a stop because its  computer system is about to go into overload.

The Social Security Administration (SSA) is desperate to move to a new data centre,  but the existing software is proving too difficult to update. A recent report by the agency's inspector general Patrick O'Carroll said that the department is grappling with a host of IT infrastructure projects and it is getting beaten to a pulp.

The department needs to replace the SSA's National Computer Center (NCC) which was built in 1979 in the next few years. So far it has been given $500 million so far to replace the outdated centre, But it is being seen as too little, to late and it is believed that it will break down by 2012. However, new centre will not be ready until 2015

Part of the problem is that the majority of the code that the department relies on is penned in COBOL. Replacing them has been deemed "too risky", so the SSA must figure out a way to restructure them to modernise the applications.

Nick Farell

E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
blog comments powered by Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments