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Friday, 07 January 2011 12:42

Google refuses to help coppers with their inquiries

Written by Nick Farell
google

Tells them it needs a court order
While Google seems ok with handing over information to advertisers, it is less keen to help a couple get back their stolen caravan.

Street View cameras might help Derbyshire police solve a crime which may have been captured by Google's cameras. However the search engine is saying that it will not hand over an uncensored verson of the image unless it gets a court order.

Coppers have pleaded, without any success, with the internet giant to release the car registration plate of a car they believe may have been involved in the theft of a family caravan. The caravan's owners spotted the picture on the Google site months after their caravan went missing. A man and his 4x4 parked are next to the caravan outside the Soanes' home.

However, in common with Street View's usual approach, the number plate of the vehicle has been blurred out.
Google has said it will only provide details of the number plate if Derbyshire Police get a court order, which officers are now trying to do.

But when police asked Google for a copy of the original, the company refused unless the force could get a court order. Officers are now trying to do that. A Google spokesperson explained: 'It's very important to Google and our users that we only provide information if valid process is followed, as laid down by governments in law.


Nick Farell

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Comments  

 
-59 #1 PainPig 2011-01-07 13:03
What a joke Google is! The police are just as stupid too, because if they were smart they would have offered Google money then they would have gotten it right away. That is how others get info from Google isn't it?
 
 
+61 #2 Freakazo_ 2011-01-07 13:56
If google handed over information without proper procedure... they would've (and should've) been prosecuted. They are just following the law.

Just ask yourself why cops need to get court orders to get information like this, and then you'll understand why it is so important for companies to not bend over and give the cops whatever they want without a warrant.
 
 
+16 #3 nECrO 2011-01-07 18:14
Quoting Freakazo_:
If google handed over information without proper procedure... they would've (and should've) been prosecuted. They are just following the law.

Just ask yourself why cops need to get court orders to get information like this, and then you'll understand why it is so important for companies to not bend over and give the cops whatever they want without a warrant.




Exactly. And if Google had just handed the info over without a court order, it would be grounds to have it thrown out of court. If the police were as smart as they are supposed to be, they would have gotten the ball rolling on the court order right away and not wasted all this time.
 
 
+4 #4 SlickR 2011-01-07 18:56
Hopefully their methods are as firm with advertisers or otherwise expect robots flying around you with ads all over it in the near future!
 
 
-21 #5 PainPig 2011-01-07 21:12
Knowingly withholding evidence is a crime isn't it?
 
 
+16 #6 Wolfdale 2011-01-08 11:46
Quoting PainPig:
Knowingly withholding evidence is a crime isn't it?


evidence not gained in legal ways are not accepted in court..

who wins with this?
 
 
+7 #7 Pistolfied 2011-01-09 08:31
Quoting Wolfdale:
Quoting PainPig:
Knowingly withholding evidence is a crime isn't it?


evidence not gained in legal ways are not accepted in court..

who wins with this?


Yup, if the evidence was presented in court it would be immediately thrown out for being obtained in an improper manner. Google is actually doing the cops a favour here as they could have screwed up their case quite badly.
 
 
+1 #8 TouchMeNot 2011-01-10 04:12
What the **** is wrong with some of you people ?
Authorities need to follow proper procedures just the same as we need to follow procedures to get things done. Cutting corners is wrong.

The authorities seem to think that just because they are the ones in power, they are able to do what they want and any way they please and expect everyone to bend over for them.
 

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