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Wednesday, 23 January 2008 09:56

MPAA admits college kids are not major pirates

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Whoops


The
film industry has admitted that a study which blamed college kids for the bulk of P2P piracy was flawed.

In a 2005 study it commissioned, the Motion Picture Association of America claimed that 44 percent of the industry's domestic losses came from illegal downloading of movies by college students. The MPAA based its legal attack on the study and used it as the basis to pressure colleges, and to lobby for legislation to force them to hand over names and addresses of students.

Now it appears that a new study shows that students were only likely responsible for 15 percent of revenue loss due to illegal downloading. Since this figure includes those who do not live on campus, the figure who use university networks is probably closer to three per cent.

More here.

Last modified on Thursday, 24 January 2008 04:49

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