Featured Articles

IHS teardown reveals Galaxy S5 BOM

IHS teardown reveals Galaxy S5 BOM

Research firm IHS got hold of Samsung’s new flagship smartphone and took it apart to the last bolt to figure out…

More...
Galaxy S5, HTC One M8 available selling well

Galaxy S5, HTC One M8 available selling well

Samsung’s Galaxy S5 has finally gone on sale and it can be yours for €699, which is quite a lot of…

More...
Intel lists Haswell refresh parts

Intel lists Haswell refresh parts

Intel has added a load of Haswell refresh parts to its official price list and there really aren’t any surprises to…

More...
Respawn confirms Titanfall DLC for May

Respawn confirms Titanfall DLC for May

During his appearance at PAX East panel and confirmed on Twitter, Titanfall developer Respawn confirmed that the first DLC pack for…

More...
KFA2 GTX 780 Ti Hall Of Fame reviewed

KFA2 GTX 780 Ti Hall Of Fame reviewed

KFA2 gained a lot of overclocking experience with the GTX 780 Hall of Fame (HOF), which we had a chance to…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Tuesday, 07 December 2010 10:00

New botnet comes to the fore

Written by Nick Farell


Beware of the Darkness
Insecurity experts have found a new botnet behind the more nasty denial of service attacks.

Dubbed "Darkness," is being controlled by several domains hosted in Russia and its operators are boasting that it can take down large sites with as few as 1,000 bots. The  botnet is a successor to the older Black Energy and Illusion botnets and according to the Shadow Server Foundation it is capable of generating large volumes of attack traffic.

The researchers said that the  throughput of the attack traffic directed simultaneously at multiple sites was quite impressive. The researchers claim that 'Darkness' is overtaking Black Energy as the DDoS weapon of choice and there also appear to be no shortage of buyers looking to add 'Darkness' to their botnet arsenal."

Shadowserver found that the Darkness botnet has been used to attack more than 100 targets in the last month including e-commerce and financial services sites.

Attacks can be launched for as little as $50 a day.

Last modified on Tuesday, 07 December 2010 10:40

Nick Farell

E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
blog comments powered by Disqus

Comments  

 
+11 #1 Jigar 2010-12-07 10:44
Internet use to be fun, but it's getting nasty out here lately. :sad:
 

To be able to post comments please log-in with Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments