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Friday, 03 December 2010 14:21

Vuvuzela turns into anti-piracy measure

Written by Nedim Hadzic

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A great method from an unlikely source
Apparently, illegitimate copies of Michel Jackson: The Experience for Nintendo DS feature unprecedented means of fighting pirates - vuvuzelas. In case you are not a football fan, vuvuzelas are South African “instruments” that made the experience of watching the World Cup resemble shoving your head into a beehive.

Reports from illegitimate MJ game copy owners suggest that when the illegal copy is detected, the game turns off important on-screen prompts. More importantly, it ruins the musical experience within the game by introducing constant buzzing that will surely introduce flashbacks with many users.

You might have already heard of, or even worse, experienced Ubisoft’s previous and somewhat Orwellian anti-piracy methods, but this latest one really suggests Ubisoft learned a valuable lesson. Dare we say it? Yeah we do, attaboy Ubisoft, that’s the way piracy’s meant to be fought.

More here.


Last modified on Friday, 03 December 2010 14:59
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