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Thursday, 25 November 2010 19:18

Microsoft faces another security nightmare

Written by Nick Farell

A new zero day bug

Software giant Microsoft is facing a bit of an insecurity crisis after a serious of zero day exploits have hit its successful Windows 7 Operating system.

First there was the Aurora exploit in the first of the year, then there was the Stuxnet case. Yesterday another serious 0-day flaw has been shown on a Chinese bulletin board. According to Security outfit Prevx, the flaw resides in win32k.sys, which is the kernel mode part of the Windows subsystem. It allows even limited user accounts to execute arbitrary code in kernel mode. What appears to be causing it Win32k.sys's NtGdiEnableEUDC API is not rightly validating some inputs.

This creates a stack overflow and overwriting the return address stored on the stack. This means that a malicious attacker can redirect the overwritten return address to his malicious code and execute it. Since it has kernel mode privileges it has practically total control of the system. Windows 7's defences, such as User Account Control and Limited User Account technology are vulnerable. So far it has not been seen in the wild.

But now that it has been published online it is only a matter of time before malware is using it.


Nick Farell

E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
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Comments  

 
+8 #1 Fud_u 2010-11-26 06:34
I'm routing for MS on this one. UAC is sort of helpful by letting you know which exact program are trying to install itself.
 
 
+6 #2 thetruth 2010-11-26 10:43
Quoting Fud_u:
I'm routing for MS on this one. UAC is sort of helpful by letting you know which exact program are trying to install itself.

Doesn't this article say that UAC is vulnerable?
 
 
+5 #3 Jaberwocky 2010-11-26 11:15
I'll be surprised if MS arn't working on a patch as we speak.When the internet starts hearing about these weakspots in the OS you can be sure that MS have already been clued in on it for a while.I expect a patch very soon during a forthcoming Patch Tuesday.
 
 
+3 #4 Bl0bb3r 2010-11-26 11:32
Quoting thetruth:
Quoting Fud_u:
I'm routing for MS on this one. UAC is sort of helpful by letting you know which exact program are trying to install itself.

Doesn't this article say that UAC is vulnerable?



It does, so UAC won't help.
 
 
+9 #5 mtottenh 2010-11-26 12:35
Gentlemen, proof read your articles... “after a serious of zero day exploits”
 

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