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Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Wednesday, 24 November 2010 14:22

More Sandy Bridge details revealed

Written by

18 models, Pentium to Core i7

We already talked about a number of Sandy Bridge processors and Intel’s plans to aggressively shift to the new architecture in 2011.

However, we really didn’t have the full picture, as we did not have the full specs for much of Intel’s low-end Sandy Bridge lineup. The guys at Computerbase.de have compiled a chart with all currently available info on the Sandy Bridge series and they have managed to score a bit more specs for the low end parts.

Intel will offer four Pentium branded dual-core Sandy parts, the G850, G840, G620 and G620T. The latter is the slowest of the lot, with a 2.2GHz clock, but it has a 35W TDP. The G620 is clocked at 2.6GHz, while the G840 and G850 run at 2.8GHz and 2.9GHz respectively and they all have a 65W TDP. As we said earlier, the Pentium series won’t support hyperthreading and they all pack 3MB of cache.

We already mentioned the Core i3 series, which will be comprised of three parts. The Core i3-2010T is the low voltage version, with a 2.5GHz clock and 35W TDP. The 2100 and 2120 run at 3.1GHz and 3.3GHz respectively and have a 65W TDP. Once again, the Core i3 series won’t support Turbo, but unlike the Pentiums, it has hyperthreading.

Both the Pentium and Core i3 series will pack HD2000 integrated graphics clocked at 850/1100MHz, except in low-voltage parts, where the clock will range from 650MHz to 1100MHz.

You can check out the full chart here.

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Comments  

 
-40 #1 HiTechpro 2010-11-24 14:41
Poor poor AMD they are being run over by INTEL and crushed, they are totally defenseless :sad: :sad:
 
 
+55 #2 loadwick 2010-11-24 14:42
What a mess!

The Intel naming guy needs to be arrested!

So Pentium doesn't get hyperthreading, i3 does get it, i5 doesn't get it except i5-2390T and the i7 does get it.

So when a lay/woman walks into a computer shop and wants a new CPU and says:

"Please can I have a Intel i7 CPU"

"ok, is it LGA-1156, LGA-1366, LGA-1155?"

"errrr"

Does Intel know there are more numbers than just 3, 5, 7?
 
 
+46 #3 Blue Fear 2010-11-24 15:02
Quoting HiTechpro:
Poor poor AMD they are being run over by INTEL and crushed, they are totally defenseless :sad: :sad:

In Bulldozer we trust..
 
 
+4 #4 leftiszi 2010-11-24 15:42
Here are same first Core i7 2600K benchmarks.

http://translate.google.com/translate?js=n&prev=_t&hl=en&ie=UTF-8&layout=2&eotf=1&sl=auto&tl=en&u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.inpai.com.cn%2Fdoc%2Fhard%2F138458.htm&act=url

I am not impressed! :(
 
 
+5 #5 loadwick 2010-11-24 15:56
Quoting leftiszi:
Here are same first Core i7 2600K benchmarks.
http://translate.google.com/translate?js=n&prev=_t&hl=en&ie=UTF-8&layout=2&eotf=1&sl=auto&tl=en&u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.inpai.com.cn%2Fdoc%2Fhard%2F138458.htm&act=url
I am not impressed! :(





I don't know, if those benchmarks are real then its not too bad. Everything has been improved and Intel was already well on top on a clock to clock basis.

We knew Sandy Bridge was going to be evolution not revolution. When you see some benchmarks that fully use AVX there will be a much bigger difference.

The main selling point of Sandy Bridge is that it's meant to be such a good overclocker, if you buy the 'K' version!

Now run those benchmarks again at 5GHz!!
 
 
0 #6 Bl0bb3r 2010-11-24 16:24
loadwick, I think it's not about what they get but how much... see the virtual vs actual core count based on class. To me it makes sense somewhat, from this perspective, except for that i5 which i think is a recycling job.
 
 
+2 #7 loadwick 2010-11-24 16:51
Quoting Bl0bb3r:
loadwick, I think it's not about what they get but how much... see the virtual vs actual core count based on class. To me it makes sense somewhat, from this perspective, except for that i5 which i think is a recycling job.




Do you not think that calling Sandy Bridge i4, i6, i8 would have been much clearer for the average customer. Then calling LGA-2011 i9. It just differentiates the different sockets and performance.

If LGA-2011 does use the name i7, which i see no indication Intel won't do that, then that will mean that i7 is used to CPUs used on 4 different sockets 1155, 1156, 1366 and 2011.
 
 
+6 #8 Wolfdale 2010-11-24 17:06
@loadwick

the problem im having with this, is that you will end up with an core i3 that actually have several totaly different architecture..
the names for cpu's should be per-architecture,
this is just confusing, you will end up with a cpu thats not only suitable on different sockets, but also completely DIFFERENT cpu's all under the same name


Do you not think that calling Sandy Bridge i4, i6, i8 would have been much clearer for the average customer. Then calling LGA-2011 i9. It just differentiates the different sockets and performance.

If LGA-2011 does use the name i7, which i see no indication Intel won't do that, then that will mean that i7 is used to CPUs used on 4 different sockets 1155, 1156, 1366 and 2011.
 
 
+6 #9 leftiszi 2010-11-24 17:31
Quoting loadwick:
I don't know, ....again at 5GHz!!


I see your point, but why should we take max overclock in mind, for comparing two chips manufactured at different processes?

Smaller manufacturing process is supposed to bring such improvements anyway.

What triggers my disappointment here, is the clock for clock improvements, which seem to be insignificant.

Also don't forget that Intel deemed the new cpus worthy of a new socket and new mobos and I bet they would have gone for new RAM if one was available. So the question that jumps to mind, is what the hell for?

Btw, Bulldozer will have AVX and 32nm as well. Intel should have watched their selling points better.
 
 
+3 #10 Bl0bb3r 2010-11-24 18:04
Quoting loadwick:
Do you not think that [...] would have been much clearer for the average customer



I can tell you haven't seen many average customers buying computers. The short answer is no... and average Joe would go to the sales person and ask him/her to suggest a product out of the available ones or they would consult a computer-expert friend and get a "buy this $xxxx one" line.
 

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