Error
  • JUser::_load: Unable to load user with id: 67

Featured Articles

HP Stream is a Chromebook killer priced at $200

HP Stream is a Chromebook killer priced at $200

We have been hearing reports of a new breed of affordable Windows notebooks for months. It is alleged that a number…

More...
AMD Radeon R7 SSD line-up goes official

AMD Radeon R7 SSD line-up goes official

AMD has officially launched its first ever SSDs and all three are part of AMD’s AMD Radeon R7 SSD series.

More...
KitKat has more than a fifth of Android users

KitKat has more than a fifth of Android users

Android 4.4 is now running on more than a fifth of Android devices, according to Google’s latest figures.

More...
Aerocool Dead Silence reviewed

Aerocool Dead Silence reviewed

Aerocool is well known for its gamer cases with aggressive styling. However, the Dead Silence chassis offers consumers a new choice,…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Tuesday, 09 November 2010 10:44

Frequent laptop use might reduce sperm quality

Written by


Lapdancers are healthier
According to a study published by the State University of New York, using laptops on your lap might have an adverse effect on male reproductive health.

Urologist Yelim Sheynkin conducted the study by placing thermometers on the scrotums of 29 men using a laptop on their laps. Within 10 to 15 minutes, the men's scrotums overheated to dangerous levels without the users noticing.

"Millions and millions of men are using laptops now, especially those in the reproductive age range," said Sheynkin. He noted that users would not become infertile simply by using laptops, but that frequent use could add to existing problems because "the scrotum doesn't have time to cool down."

The obvious solution would be to take assume a different stance and spread the legs apart, but even this doesn't help much, as the testes will overheat in about 30 minutes.

"No matter what you do, even with the legs spread wide apart, the temperature is still going to be higher than what we call safe," said Sheynkin.

More here.

E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
blog comments powered by Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments