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Tuesday, 26 October 2010 09:39

US continues to pursue jailbreakers

Written by Nick Farell


Even though it is legal
Although the US Library of Congress has ruled that jailbreaking hardware is legal, the US government continues to jail those who try it.

A Southern California man has been arrested on accusations of running a home business of jailbreaking videogame consoles so they can play pirated games. According to Wired Homeland Security authorities arrested Matthew Crippen, 27, from his Anaheim home following his indictment for allegedly breaching the Digital Millennium Copyright Act of 1998.

The student is charged with hiring himself out to circumvent copyrighted encryption technology on Wii, Playstation and Xbox games. Prosecutor Mark Krause said in a brief telephone interview that, if the case went to trial, the kid could get a decade inside. According to Threat Level the purpose of the jailbreaking was not for illegal piracy, but to allow patrons to use decrypted copies of their own DRM-laden gaming software.

However he might go down because he is accused of profiting from his hacks.

Nick Farell

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