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Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Friday, 22 October 2010 12:19

Linux has a serious security flaw

Written by Nick Farell


Deep in the kernel
Insecurity outfit VSR Security has warned that the Linux operating system contains a serious security flaw that can be exploited to gain superuser rights on a target system.

The vulnerability, in the Linux implementation of the Reliable Datagram Sockets (RDS) protocol, affects unpatched versions of the Linux kernel, starting from 2.6.30, where the RDS protocol was first included. VSR Security said that Linux installations are only vulnerable if the CONFIG_RDS kernel configuration option is set, and if there are no restrictions on unprivileged users loading packet family modules, as is the case on most stock distributions.

Kernel functions responsible for copying data between kernel and user space. If they don't verify that a user-provided address resided in the user segment, a local attacker could issue specially crafted socket function calls to write arbritrary values into kernel memory. Once they have done that it is a doddle to escalate privileges to root.

The outfit has been showing off a proof-of-concept exploit to demonstrate the severity of the vulnerability.  The exploit was tested on Ubuntu 10.04 (64-bit) and opened a root shell.  There is a patch available and the problem will be fixed in the next Kernel upgrade.

Nick Farell

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Comments  

 
+2 #1 hellfire 2010-10-22 12:29
Quote:
Insecurity outfit VSR Security has warned that the Linux operating system contains a serious security flaw that can be exploited to gain superuser rights on a target system.
(...)
he outfit has been showing off a proof-of-concept exploit to demonstrate the severity of the vulnerability.



about Linux security flaw

Quote:
The fruity peddler of broken iPhones said has been showing off a beta version of its FaceTime video chat service to the Mac which has a fairly nasty security hole on it.
(...)
Apple fanboys insist that there is no problem (...) However it is hardly the point.


about apple security flaw

yep you definitelly got no problems with apple at all :lol:
 
 
+8 #2 aussiebear 2010-10-22 13:10
Nick, you could at least have the courtesy to post the link of the advisory.
=> http://www.vsecurity.com/resources/advisory/20101019-1/

...Which shows you where you can get the patch or apply the workaround.
 
 
+8 #3 ogi 2010-10-22 13:39
There are dozens of security flaws in all OS out there discovered each month, why is this one in particular so news worthy?
 
 
+38 #4 Warhead 2010-10-22 14:14
Security flaw in Linux. Sequence of events:

Day 1am - Flaw discovered
Day 1am - Flaw published
Day 1pm - Community working on solution
Day 2am - Patch released.
Day 2pm - Back to business as usual

Shall I do the same for Apple's flaw?

Might run out of space here :D
 
 
+3 #5 Bl0bb3r 2010-10-22 17:38
Quoting Warhead:
Shall I do the same for Apple's flaw?

Might run out of space here :D


That's a definitely. :D
Although, I doubt they would publish their software flaws.
 
 
-5 #6 Taoist 2010-10-23 18:54
Quoting Warhead:
Shall I do the same for Apple's flaw?

Might run out of space here :D






Could you? Using 3+ non-cherry picked examples? I am not being accusatory, I am merely interested what the dynamic looks like, and what the explanation might be. (The majority of the community isn't made up of programmers, perhaps?)
 
 
+2 #7 yourma2000 2010-10-26 16:28
I'm sure that all OS have a catalogue of flaws big and small which are yet to be identified. People say that Windows is the most insecure of the three OSs, but that's only because it is the most used OS in the world and waves of hackers target the OS discovering security holes, if it were one of the Mac or Linux OSs then I'm sure they'd be in the same position, so I'd say that non of the major OSs are safe in their own right.
 

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