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Tuesday, 14 September 2010 09:36

Gamers have good brains

Written by Nick Farell
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Shoot-em-ups can make fast decision makers
Boffins at the University of Rochester have worked out that first-person shooter players are better at making fast, accurate decisions based on evidence extracted from their surroundings. They have also discovered that when those who don't normally play action video games improved their inference skills after being forced to play just 50 hours.

The boffins have concluded that action video gamers better decision makers? The short answer appears to be yes. Writing in the popular science magazine Current Biology, which we get for the Spot the Brain Cell competition, the researchers said that they compared the skills of action gamers versus non-gamers by presenting both groups with simple decision-making experiments.

People appeared in the form of an array of dots and the volunteers had to discern the person's main direction of movement. They made this task easier and harder by adding to or taking away the number of dots moving in one direction. Gamers could identify direction both faster and more accurately than non-gamers.

Top boffin Daphne Bavelier, professor of brain and cognitive sciences at Rochester said hat gamers needed experience with "shooter games, where you go through a maze and you don't know when a villain will appear. Strategy and role-playing games apparently won't work.

Nick Farell

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Comments  

 
+25 #1 xaira 2010-09-14 10:12
"Strategy and role-playing games apparently won't work."

sorry sims/starcraft players
 
 
+13 #2 leftiszi 2010-09-14 12:23
How about tetris?
 
 
+12 #3 thematrix606 2010-09-14 13:00
So expect to see "Duke Nukem Forever manuals" laying around in your school classrooms in the year 2050!
 
 
+16 #4 FoxMontage 2010-09-14 13:45
Man, I would love to be "forced" to play FPS for 50 hours.
 
 
+5 #5 yourma2000 2010-09-14 13:56
Last year in college we did an experiment on reaction speeds, we had to catch a ruler several times and work out the average stopping distance, because I was the only PC gamer that played quick FPS games I came out on top of the class, I was twice as fast as the dude in second place, supporting proof we do have good brains & fast reactions
 
 
+16 #6 B0GiE-uk- 2010-09-14 14:58
Can I get a degree for pooning n00bs then?!
 
 
+8 #7 iicsus 2010-09-14 19:00
Quoting thematrix606:
So expect to see "Duke Nukem Forever manuals" laying around in your school classrooms in the year 2050!


I don't think it'll be out by then.
 
 
-2 #8 Taoist 2010-09-14 21:39
'fast reactions' do not qualify as 'good brains'. Otherwise the gamers with the fastest reactions wouldn't be spending thousands of hours on a hobby based on self-validation when they could've legitimately learned a proffesion in the same amount of time.
 
 
+2 #9 thematrix606 2010-09-14 23:05
Quoting Taoist:
'fast reactions' do not qualify as 'good brains'. Otherwise the gamers with the fastest reactions wouldn't be spending thousands of hours on a hobby based on self-validation when they could've legitimately learned a proffesion in the same amount of time.


Good job on trying to ruin the fun! But nuh huh! Define 100 years out of eternity...

Exactly, it doesn't really matter what you do!
 
 
0 #10 Taoist 2010-09-14 23:56
Quoting thematrix606:
Good job on trying to ruin the fun! But nuh huh! Define 100 years out of eternity...

Exactly, it doesn't really matter what you do!





But it does. Every single millisecond holds it's own place in history, and while the validity of any moral and sociological viewpoints may be under question (as might be the importance of a week in a millenia), what does hold value are the emotions a person experiences in the here and now. Happiness, sadness. Regardless of the fact whether Humanity erases itself, it behooves us to contribute as much as possible to society, and vice versa, taking nothing for granted, while there are still those who can feel happy or sad in this point in time.
 

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