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Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Wednesday, 18 August 2010 09:52

Google CEO offers interesting views on online privacy

Written by


Young people will change names to escape cyber past
Google CEO Eric Schmidt believes that some young people will have to change their identities to escape the ghosts of their pasts, meticulously recorded on Facebook and similar social notworking services. He added that every young person will eventually be allowed to change their name and distance themselves from embarrassing material posted on social networking sites.

"I don't believe society understands what happens when everything is available, knowable and recorded by everyone all the time," Schmidt said.

Schmidt does make a good point. Employers will have access to some rather disturbing content posted by today’s teens and tomorrow’s job applicants. Beer kegs, dilated pupils and red eyes featured in quite a few photos probably won’t help anyone’s chances of getting a job, unless they’re applying for work in the porn industry.

Schmidt also talked about Google, oddly enough. He believes that the future of search services will be somewhat different and that new services and features will change the way people go about their daily routine.
"I actually think most people don't want Google to answer their questions. They want Google to tell them what they should be doing next,” said Schmidt. He noted that Google would be all-knowing, all-powerful and that it will know what you care about, what you like and who your friends are. It could even remind users what they need to buy when passing a shop. In my case that would be a bottle of scotch and two packs of Gauloises, not sure I need Google to figure out this though.

More here.

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Comments  

 
+2 #1 ghelyar 2010-08-18 10:35
Zero Cool -> Crash Override
 
 
0 #2 valhar2000 2010-08-18 11:54
Another possibility, I suppose, is that, eventually, things will get to the point where almost every candidate is "unacceptable" because every candidate has drunk pictures up on Facebook. When that happens, the employers of the future will just have ignore these things.

Lets face it: almost everyone gets hammered at some point when they are teenagers, and if things really get to the point where everyone has this embarrassing information recorded on Facebook, this will simply become mainstream and normal, and employers (and everyone else) will ignore it.

I can't guarantee that this will happen, but I do see it as a distinct possibility.
 
 
-3 #3 ApNw 2010-08-18 17:44
Quote:
Schmidt does make a good point. Employers will have access to some rather disturbing content posted by today’s teens and tomorrow’s job applicants. Beer kegs, dilated pupils and red eyes featured in quite a few photos probably won’t help anyone’s chances of getting a job


I completely disagree, I have absolutely nothing to hide and wouldn't mind at all.
 
 
+1 #4 Elfa 2010-08-18 20:18
What they need to do is pass a law restricting the use of social networking information being used as the basis of hiring practices.
 
 
+2 #5 klaudyuxxx 2010-08-20 12:07
Quoting ApNw:
Quote:
Schmidt does make a good point. Employers will have access to some rather disturbing content posted by today’s teens and tomorrow’s job applicants. Beer kegs, dilated pupils and red eyes featured in quite a few photos probably won’t help anyone’s chances of getting a job


I completely disagree, I have absolutely nothing to hide and wouldn't mind at all.


Schmidt was talking about ALL the people in the world, and not just you. What applies to you doesn't apply to everybody.
 

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