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Friday, 13 August 2010 09:43

Nvidia to stay in ARM market

Written by


CEO pins high hopes on Android
In an interview with CNET's Brooke Chrothers, Nvidia CEO Jen-Hsun Huang confirmed that the company has a long CPU strategy, but sans x86.

“Our CPU strategy is ARM,” said Huang. "ARM is the fastest growing processor architecture in the world today. ARM supports Android best. And Android is the fastest growing OS in the world today."

He stressed that Nvidia’s dual-core Tegra 2 chips are available in two versions, geared towards mobile phones and tablets, adding that both versions are currently being designed into products.

Huang also commented Nvidia’s licensing dispute with Intel. He concluded that Nvidia has been out of the chipset business for over a year and that the damage has already been done.

“If this got resolved we're not expecting to ramp back up the thousand engineers that we had working on chipsets," he said.

More here.

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Comments  

 
-3 #1 dicobalt 2010-08-14 19:59
I really wouldn't call using ARM a CPU strategy. It's more of a mobile strategy. When I hear CPU I think of servers and desktops, not phones, tablets and gadgets. Nvidia would not be capable of making competitive x86 CPU's even if they had a license from Intel.

Besides, I thought Nvidia was a software company?
 
 
0 #2 blandead 2010-08-16 05:39
a software company?

....
 
 
0 #3 Mists 2010-08-16 16:45
Quoting dicobalt:
I really wouldn't call using ARM a CPU strategy. It's more of a mobile strategy. When I hear CPU I think of servers and desktops, not phones, tablets and gadgets. Nvidia would not be capable of making competitive x86 CPU's even if they had a license from Intel.

Besides, I thought Nvidia was a software company?


Really? Software? Do you mind sharing the names of the software released by Nvidia that isn't related to hardware?
 

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