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Tuesday, 06 July 2010 11:34

More details on Powercolor's HD 5770 Vortex

Written by Slobodan Simic
powercolorlogo

Twistable fan

Since yesterday's piece on Powercolor's upcoming HD 5770 Vortex graphics card, we managed to score some additional info regarding the fan. Or to be precise, we managed to clarify some things regarding its performance.

The cooler on the card is actually a dual-slot design and will feature the same cooling performance as the PCS+ version, except for the fact that you can actually twist the fan and make it rise a bit in order to blow air over greater surface.

When pulled out to take "almost three slots" the Vortex should be better than the PCS+ cooler, including noise and performance.

The new Powercolor HD 5770 Vortex is scheduled to launch pretty soon, probably in next week or two, and then we will know for sure how good it is.

powercolor_hd5770vortex_1

powercolor_hd5770vortex_2
Last modified on Tuesday, 06 July 2010 12:16
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Comments  

 
0 #1 dicobalt 2010-07-06 14:34
Crossfire review comparing it to a 5870 perhaps? People underestimate 5770 Crossfire. Cheaper and just as fast as a 5870. Sometimes faster.
 
 
+1 #2 Bl0bb3r 2010-07-06 14:50
Cheaper? Wouldn't a CFX maiboard also cost more than a single x16 slot 780G/880G? Just saying, saving in one end makes you spend more in the other. Plus, an IGP is helpful when that dedicated card dies, which happens eventually.
 
 
0 #3 dicobalt 2010-07-06 15:03
Yep, but it just so turns out that many people already have x16 x8 slot boards which still work great. You don't need x16 x16 for two 5770's. Intel people too not just AMD people. Remember Intel only supported Crossfire for the longest time because Nvidia was an asshat about SLI. That's a big upgrader market tied to Crossfire.
 
 
0 #4 fudo 2010-07-06 15:28
Radeon 5870 is still quite expensive and I guess that two 5770 are indeed a good idea, as they can save you some serious money.
 
 
0 #5 Bl0bb3r 2010-07-06 15:45
dicobalt, not really, if u look at newegg's review count, there are more people with 1x16 mb than cfx mb.

Also consider if cfx scales well, which it doesn't on every game, in fact don't count just major titles used in reviews which get cfx profiles and updates but every other game which doesn't. It'll still put my money on a 5870, or 5850.
 
 
0 #6 estani 2010-07-07 09:18
Gee... with that size you'd better install an air conditioning system.
 
 
0 #7 Bl0bb3r 2010-07-07 22:16
Quoting estani:
Gee... with that size you'd better install an air conditioning system.

Dude... it's not a fermi! :lol:
 

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