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Friday, 02 July 2010 09:44

Apple fanboys are revolting

Written by Nick Farell


iPhone 4 is taking the mickey
Steve Jobs might have taken things a bit far when he released his iPhone 4 which could only be used by right handed people. Instead of admitting the phone was broken, Steve told the world+dog they should use the phone the way he tells them.

However while some Apple fanboys masochistically love to be treated that way, it seems that some feel that Jobs has gone too far this time. Two law suits have been started in the United States over antenna problems on its newest iPhone model. A putative class action filed Tuesday in the US District court for the Northern District of California against Apple and AT&T - the iPhone's exclusive wireless carrier in the United States - includes allegations of fraud by concealment, negligence, intentional misrepresentation and defective design.

"The iPhone 4 manifests design and manufacturing defects that were known to defendants before it was released which were not disclosed to consumers, namely, a connection problem caused by the iPhone 4's antenna configuration that makes it difficult or impossible to maintain a connection to AT&T's network," the lawsuit said.

Apple and AT&T have failed to provide customer support and customers have been left with only three remedies: "hold their phones in an awkward and unnatural manner," pay a 10 per cent restocking fee and return their phones, or pay US$29.95 to buy one of Apple's cases that are said to fix the reception problem.

In another class action in the US District Court for the District of Maryland Kevin McCaffrey and Linda Wrinn said they were flogged a "defective" iPhone 4 unit, which dropped calls and data service "when held it normally.”
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