Featured Articles

Analysts expect ARM to do well next year

Analysts expect ARM to do well next year

British chip designer ARM could cash in on the mobile industry's rush to transition to 64-bit operating systems and hardware.

More...
Huawei and Xiaomi outpace Lenovo, LG in smartphone market

Huawei and Xiaomi outpace Lenovo, LG in smartphone market

Samsung has lost smartphone market share, ending the quarter on a low note and Xiaomi appears to be the big winner.

More...
Intel Broadwell 15W coming to CES

Intel Broadwell 15W coming to CES

It looks like Intel will be showing off its 14nm processors, codenames Broadwell, in a couple of weeks at CES 2015.

More...
Gainward GTX 980 Phantom reviewed

Gainward GTX 980 Phantom reviewed

Today we’ll be taking a closer look at the recently introduced Gainward GTX 980 4GB with the company’s trademark Phantom cooler.

More...
Zotac ZBOX Sphere OI520 barebones vs Sphere Plus review

Zotac ZBOX Sphere OI520 barebones vs Sphere Plus review

Zotac has been in the nettop and mini-PC space for more than four years now and it has managed to carve…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Friday, 19 March 2010 18:00

Cooler Master 690 Advanced reviewed - 4. Inside the CM 690 Advanced

Written by Sanjin Rados


ImageImage

Review: The new king of the middle








CM 690 Advanced is black inside and out, which makes it pretty cool especially if you purchase the version with the side panel window. As you can see from the picture below, the case is roomy enough. In fact, the case will take any graphics card except for the HD 5970, which is over 310mm long. Good thing about the case is that the HDD trays can be removed from the front, so you won’t need to take out the graphics card if you change disks. The case supports microATX and ATX motherboards.

Image
 
The motherboard tray features plenty of holes, with the largest one for the CPU cooling. This will make sure that large and heavy cooling solutions, like those requiring a backplate, can be mounted without taking the motherboard out of the case. The rest of the holes are for cable management.

Image
 
HDD trays won’t get in the way of other components, but you’ll probably have to remove the side panel when connecting or disconnecting the HDD. If you only have one or two HDDs, you can pull the tray out and then disconnect the cables, but if more disks use the same cable, you’ll have to access them from behind the right the side panel. The CM 690 Advance will take up to 3.5’’ HDDs, provided that one is placed in the 5.25’’ bay using the provided bracket.

Image
 
In order to mount a 2.5’’ HDD/SSD, a special HDD tray can be used, but only one tray supports it and you can use it to mount two 2.5’’ fans. You can see it on the picture above.

Image
 
You can mount up to four optical drives all without reaching for tools, as the case uses lock/open system on the picture below. We must admit that the locking system is much better than the system used on our recently tested and by the way much pricier Obsidian 800D case.

Image

The CM 690 Advanced comes with three fans – two 140mm fans ( A14025-10CB-3BN-F1 : 1200 RPM, 19 dBA) are located on top and front of the case, and the front panel features a blue LED that can be turned on or off via the I/O panel. The rear panel features a small 120mm fan ( A12025-12CB-3BN-F1 : 1200 RPM, 17dBA). It’s worth noting that the top panel can house one more 120/140mm fan, and as we said before, the CM 690 Advanced will take up to 11 fans.

Image

The CM 690 Advanced uses thumb screws, so you won’t be needing tools. CoolerMaster thought of the inexperienced ones as well and marked the holes with letters, which will help you mount the motherboard the right way, whether it’s ATX or mATX.

The front fan is almost invisible as it’s hidden behind HDD trays, but if you choose so, you can turn on its LED lamp so the fan will give off a nice blue glow visible through the grill.

Image

The front panel can be removed in order to mount/change a fan or optical drive, and the procedure is as simple as a slight pull on the bottom of the front panel. We must admit it’s much easier than on the previous version, and you can see the case without the front panel on the picture below.

Image
 
One of the four 5.25’’ bays can be turned into a 3.5’’ bay via a bracket, which will come in handy for those looking to add a floppy disk, card reader or some other smaller device. As you can see on the picture below, CoolerMaster includes a neat 5.25’’ mesh lid with an opening for a 3.5’’ device.

Image
 

The top part of the case can be removed, in case you want to replace an existing fan or simply add another. In order to do this, you’ll have to remove the sides of the case and use the latches to release the top part.

Image
 
You’ll notice that the docking station uses SATA connectors, which is pretty nice as some cheaper cases come with much slower USB connection.

The PSU is mounted on the bottom of the case, and CoolerMaster used rubber feet in order to minimize vibration and thus minimize noise. If you look below the case you’ll notice that it features a large air inlet.

Image


(Page 4 of 6)
Last modified on Friday, 19 March 2010 19:48
blog comments powered by Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments