Featured Articles

Analysts expect ARM to do well next year

Analysts expect ARM to do well next year

British chip designer ARM could cash in on the mobile industry's rush to transition to 64-bit operating systems and hardware.

More...
Huawei and Xiaomi outpace Lenovo, LG in smartphone market

Huawei and Xiaomi outpace Lenovo, LG in smartphone market

Samsung has lost smartphone market share, ending the quarter on a low note and Xiaomi appears to be the big winner.

More...
Intel Broadwell 15W coming to CES

Intel Broadwell 15W coming to CES

It looks like Intel will be showing off its 14nm processors, codenames Broadwell, in a couple of weeks at CES 2015.

More...
Gainward GTX 980 Phantom reviewed

Gainward GTX 980 Phantom reviewed

Today we’ll be taking a closer look at the recently introduced Gainward GTX 980 4GB with the company’s trademark Phantom cooler.

More...
Zotac ZBOX Sphere OI520 barebones vs Sphere Plus review

Zotac ZBOX Sphere OI520 barebones vs Sphere Plus review

Zotac has been in the nettop and mini-PC space for more than four years now and it has managed to carve…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Monday, 23 February 2009 18:21

MSI GX620 Gaming notebook with Turbo Engine tested - 5. The battery, Synthetic and Game tests and Conclusion

Written by Sanjin Rados

ImageImage

Review: Works at 2.7GHz and have the looks


MSI GX620X is advertised as a gaming laptop, so we decided to test its graphics power by running a couple of Vantage tests first.

3dMark Vantage

The scores show that the Turbo Engine mode does a good job of increasing the CPU performance. However, Vantage calculates results based on both the CPU and the GPU scores, and although CPU performance benefited from overclocking, the GPU results stayed the same and such a scenario resulted in minimum total score increase. The pictures speak more than words, so you can see for yourself.

 undefined
MSI’s Turbo engine doesn’t affect the graphics card’s GPU.

undefined
A 20% CPU overclock increases its score by 8%, but total Vantage test scores increase by less than 1%.

The following picture shows Vantage scores in Presentation mode, where the processor stays at 1596MHz. Let us remind you that the CPU, when in gaming mode, runs at 2.26GHz, whereas turning the Turbo mode results in a 15% or 20% overclock, overclocking the CPU to 2.6GHz or 2.7GHz respectively.
 undefined

3D Mark 06


3DMark tests scores a bit higher than 5K, which would be a great result a couple of years ago, but today it’s not quite impressive. Still, it shows that the 9600M GT packs some gaming potential, and you’ll probably comfortably play some older titles. The Gaming mode scores less than the Turbo mode, which is again due to lower CPU clock in Gaming mode.


undefined

undefined

Before we see how the GX620X handles FarCry 2 in DX10 and DX9, we’ll see how PC Vantage rated our system.

PC Vantage

 undefined

undefined

Far Cry 2


We only played Far Cry 2 at 1280x1024, since 1680x1050, although supported by the GX620X, is too tough cookie for the Geforce 9600M GT. As we’ve said so far, if the laptop isn’t plugged into the wall outlet, the performance is so low that gaming at 1280x1024 and low detail settings will still be an impossible task.

Even at 1024x760, we managed to squeeze out less than 20fps, whereas 800x600 resulted in a framerate of 20-23 fps.

In Vista DX10 mode, on AC mode, performance is a couple of fps lower than in DX9 mode. At 1280x1024 and high settings, we managed to muster about 22fps, whereas medium graphics settings resulted in average 33fps – of course, we’re talking about DX9. The Turbo option helped a bit, and resulted in 1-3fps more depending on the location within the level.


Call of Duty - World at War

Just like Far Cry 2, you won’t be playing this game at higher than 1280x1024. With no antialiasing and aniso filters, performance averaged at 23.74 ps in Gaming mode and 24.58 in Turbo mode. Still, you can game nicely despite the low framecount. All the options, such as shadows, dynamic leaves, and such were on.

HDD Test - We tested MSI GX620X notebook with the OCZ SSD disk here.


Image


Temperatures

GPU temperatures were kept in check, and we didn’t measure higher than 71 degrees Celsius. Again, note that the laptop can get quite hot on the right side, where the CPU and the graphics card are located.


undefined

Riva Tuner obviously didn’t read the graphics card’s memory clocks correctly, which overclock to 800MHz in 3D mode (1600MHz effectively). GPUZ did a better job, and it’s evident from the following picture.

undefined

Processor temperatures under maximum workload (we used the prime 95 test) went up to 68 degrees, again acceptable levels.

undefined


Conclusion


Today, we’ve seen how MSI’s GX620X laptop handles gaming, and we must admit that with a nearby power outlet, it does quite a job. You’ll need power to start the Turbo engine, that can overclock your CPU by 15% or 20% as the choice is yours. Turbo engine is MSI’s unique feature but it will be of better use during CPU intensive operations rather than gaming.

The overclock applies for the CPU only and not the graphics card, so it only brings minor in-game benefits. However, if Turbo was to apply for graphics cards too, it would’ve been an instant hit, but it would probably additionally boost temperatures as well so MSI didn’t opt for such a move.

Gaming at 1280x1024 is not a problem, and you’ll be playing newer titles as well but with lowered detail settings.

Looks-wise, the GX620X looks nice and sturdy, as well as its 15.4in monitor supporting the 1680x1050 resolution. We found a couple of cons to be certain key's size, but that's about it. One of the most appealing features are the sensor keys, where you'll find the on-the-fly Turbo key, which overclocks the CPU from 2.26 to 2.7GHz.

Priced at about €950, and with such nice technical characteristics, MSI GX620X rightfully deserves our award, but we wouldn't go and say it's a real gaming laptop. We hope that the future version will get a bit graphics and this will probably happen sooner rather than later.

Image




Reviewers: Sanjin Radoš and Edita Radoš

(Page 5 of 5)
Last modified on Tuesday, 24 February 2009 12:40
blog comments powered by Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments