Featured Articles

5th Generation Broadwell 14nm family comes in three lines

5th Generation Broadwell 14nm family comes in three lines

Intel's 5th Core processor family, codenamed Broadwell, will launch in three lines for the mobile segment. We are talking about upcoming…

More...
Broadwell Chromebooks coming in late Q1 2015

Broadwell Chromebooks coming in late Q1 2015

Google's Chromebook OS should be updating automatically every six weeks, but Intel doesn't come close with its hardware refresh schedule.

More...
New round of Nexus phone rumour kicks off

New round of Nexus phone rumour kicks off

Rumours involving upcoming Nexus devices are nothing uncommon, but this year there is a fair bit of confusion, especially on the…

More...
Nvidia officially launches the 8-inch Shield Tablet

Nvidia officially launches the 8-inch Shield Tablet

As expected and reported earlier, Nvidia has now officially announced its newest Shield device, the new 8-inch Shield Tablet. While the…

More...
Aerocool Dead Silence reviewed

Aerocool Dead Silence reviewed

Aerocool is well known for its gamer cases with aggressive styling. However, the Dead Silence chassis offers consumers a new choice,…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Thursday, 06 December 2007 02:13

ASUS P5E3 X38 has improved VRM - 8 Conclusion

Written by Eliot Kucharik

ImageImage

Review: Quite fast, but too expensive


Conclusion:

ASUS has again made a huge step forward regarding the VRM design. This board is not a CPU overclocking board, we are not sure if the VRM or the P4 cpu-power connector holds it back at high frequencies where the VRM has to deliver massive amperes with stable voltage. A very good power-consumption result is ruined by the 3666MHz measurements. Another drawback is the exclusive usage of the PCIe x16 slots for graphics cards only. Some BIOS settings would have avoided such behavior.

On the plus side is stable operation, highly overclockable memory and FSB, the best power consumption an ASUS board ever got.

For us, this board is a mixed bag, not bad, but not as good, either. While a "standard" board, it's extraordinarily expensive, priced about €180,- and requiring very expensive DDR3 modules which will give you none to little advantage compared to DDR2. Besides the ASUS IR Remote, you will not receive any fancy extras. 

If you spend some more money you can grab a DFI LANparty P35 board previously tested in our labs and if you wait two more weeks the DFI X38 boards should arrive and cost under €200,. Even ASUS is offering an high-end solution called "Maximus Formula" for under €200, too, which has a nicer layout, Supreme FX soundcard and other fancy stuff; we will tell you soon if it's worth the bucks.

(Page 8 of 8)
Last modified on Friday, 07 December 2007 05:29
blog comments powered by Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments