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Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Monday, 26 November 2007 10:22

Music industry lets Harvard pirates go

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Attacks other universities


While
the music industry has been attacking universities for allowing P2P piracy on their networks, it has been leaving the Ivy league prestigious Harvard University alone.

Warner Music, EMI, Vivendi Universal and Sony BMG’s RIAA have been aggressively pursuing piracy cases at Columbia University, Duke University, Dartmouth College, University of Pennsylvania, Yale, Princeton, and Brown University.

It seems to be making Harvard University an exception to prosecution, and that might have something to do with the fact that Charles Nesson, William F. Weld Professor of Law at Harvard Law School, and founder and faculty Co-director of the Berkman Center for Internet & Society, and John Palfrey, Clinical Professor of Law and Executive Director of the Berkman Center are advising that universities should have no part in this "extraordinary process."

Apparently, the music industry is terrified that if it goes after Harvard in court, it will face some of the best legal minds in the U.S. who will shred its case against them completely.

More here.
Last modified on Monday, 26 November 2007 13:43

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