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Monday, 15 December 2008 12:51

Microsoft knew Xbox could damage your discs

Written by Nedim Hadzic

Image

And did nothing

 

Well, we have to congratulate Microsoft on this one, as this is probably one of the prototypical user-unfriendly practices in the console world. A document unsealed in a lawsuit last week suggests that Microsoft was aware that Xbox 360 could damage your discs, and launched it anyway.

There are currently a couple of lawsuits charging Microsoft of Xbox 360’s defective design. The defect in question occurs when you tilt or swivel your console, which can introduce some serious scratches on your disc.

Microsoft program manager, Hiroo Umeno, says Microsoft knew about it and as soon as the first issue was reported, they immediately knew the cause.

Microsoft’s solution ended up being non-existent, although they sent the team of engineers to investigate the problem. There were three possible solutions, of which two would meddle with the already installed mechanisms or increase loading times, whereas the third possible solution would’ve cost Microsoft an arm and a leg. So instead, Microsoft did nothing.

Microsoft later instituted an Xbox 360 disc replacement program, but it only applied to Microsoft titles and cost $20 per disc. Hey, it’s more money, who can argue with that? As for the actual solution, Microsoft now just instructs users not to move the console until they remove the disc, as if we have never thought of that on our own.

More here.

Last modified on Tuesday, 16 December 2008 03:29
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