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Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Friday, 22 February 2008 12:06

Games will be Internet-based

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Top developers claim


Computer games will slowly all migrate to the Internet, according to a panel of experts.

Speaking to the BBC, the Panel, includes EA Games' Neil Young, Sony's Phil Harrison, Raph Koster, Fable creator Peter Molyneux and Dungeon Siege creator, Chris Taylor, and developer David Perry.

Young said that everything was moving toward the network, while Harrison said that public utility computing is absolutely the future of the games industry.

Young said that it will be a huge game changer for the industry when there is no requirement for there to be a machine in the home. If a player was connected to a Google server farm in Oregon, for it to be rendered, sent down the pipe and shown on a television that you paid an extra five or 10 dollars to your cable company to guarantee you had good enough bandwidth for gaming.

He thought that was inevitable.

Raph Koster pointed out that Flash developments were pointing the way the future is going. He said that games will be playing off the same back end, and will be serving different heads of the game on different devices.

More here.
Last modified on Friday, 22 February 2008 17:42
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