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Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Wednesday, 07 November 2007 11:23

Fan film favorite killed by Games Workshop

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Image

End of project


Games Workshop
has killed off one of the most ambitious fan films ever made. Damnatus was made by German fans of the Warhammer 40,000 game, cost more than 10,000 euros and took months to film, and scenes were shown online to drum up support. It ran 110 minutes and had loads of high-tech special effects, but Huan Vu, Director and Producer of the film, said Damnatus' creators have now given up trying to get the film in front of an audience.

But Games Workshop, which created Warhammer 40,000, has refused to give permission for the film to be shown. A Games Workshop spokesman said that to lose control of Warhammer or Warhammer 40,000 was simply unthinkable. Filming on Damnatus continued after Games Workshop had asked Mr. Vu and his colleagues to stop due to a misunderstanding.

The BBC quotes Dr. Guido Westkamp, a lecturer on intellectual property law at the University of London, who said copyright cases are always tricky to resolve and this is made more difficult by the technology involved.

More here.
Last modified on Thursday, 08 November 2007 04:58
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