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Friday, 03 April 2009 12:10

Apple patents iPhone that calls the cops

Written by Nick Farell

Image

Help I am being stolen


Fruit-themed toymaker Apple is so concerned that its fanboys are getting their iPhones nicked, along with the lunch money their mother gave them, that it has invented a feature that allows the gizmo to call the cops.

According to Appleinsider, the latest iPhone security-related patent describes the implementation of loss prevention software that would notify a security agency in the event the handset is lost or stolen. The big idea is that a copper could be dispatched to the current location of the device based on GPS coordinates and shoot the iPhone thief.

"To provide greater security, an electronic device in a security mode can be configured to enter a 'lock-down' mode when the device is exposed to vibration or acceleration above a predetermined lock-down threshold, thereby preventing unauthorized use of the device," the company adds.

In other words if the thief grabs the phone and hits the Apple fanboy over the head with it it could trigger the security lock down mode. Users can set preferences that determine various states or in which an iPhone would switch into its security mode, such as when the device has been idle, without user input and/or certain vibration/acceleration events, for a while. 

After all no Apple fanboy would ever leave his phone without wanting to touch it or stroke it for five minutes.

More here.
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